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  • I have just updated to the new version of WP [12.7.2018] and found it to be a real poor version. Huge departure from the standards for blog posting, total change of the UI on blog posting and it plain and simply works like [ EXPLETIVE DELETED ].

    Paragraphing is impossible and it is extremely cumbersome to use.

    Please revert back.

Viewing 15 replies - 1 through 15 (of 30 total)
  • Moderator Steven Stern (sterndata)

    (@sterndata)

    Support Team Volunteer

    >> Please revert back. <<

    That’s not going to happen. Install the plugin “classic editor” to restore the old editor.

    dhoff2423

    (@dhoff2423)

    Thanks. Now, how do I install the classic editor?

    Moderator Steven Stern (sterndata)

    (@sterndata)

    Support Team Volunteer

    Like any plugin. Plugins -> ADD NEW. You’ll see Classic Editor on the 2nd or 3rd row. Install and activate it, then go to SETTINGS->WRITING and make it the default editor.

    dhoff2423

    (@dhoff2423)

    Thanks for the info. I didn’t know it was a plug in but have it now. Thanks once again.

    That’s not going to happen.

    Don’t be fooled.

    You can go back to the older version.

    Do a search … I found the answer. I am going to do just that this weekend.

    WP 5.0 just proves WP is a baby that never grow up.

    What is Guttenberg suppose to do? Trying to be a page builder? Then be a page builder, but there is nothing like that. We needs all those useless blocks when you can easily get all those things done (and way more) without Guttenberg? In fact, Guttenberg actually restrict what can be done.

    Listen, all we ask is a fast & light WP. Make it lighter, make it faster. Period. Right now, it’s a very Slow memory hog.

    2 Words – Light, Fast. That’s all. The rest leave it to the theme/plugin developer.

    Moderator Steven Stern (sterndata)

    (@sterndata)

    Support Team Volunteer

    @sexilyspeaking: Your feelings have been noted; there’s no need to reply to every block editor / WP 5 related post, especially if you’re not offering a solution to the original poster’s issue. I’m going to put your account on moderation for a while with the hope that you’ll transition to helpful commenting.

    Moderator Ipstenu (Mika Epstein)

    (@ipstenu)

    🏳️‍🌈 Plugin Review Team Rep

    If you want to roll back to WP 4.9.8, you can simply reinstall it over the current version. Since it’s a major release, WP will not auto-update your site, and you’ll remain secure as we back port security fixes all the way to the 3.7.x branch.

    That said, you will not get any new features, so it comes at a cost. The Classic Editor will remain supported until end of 2021 (according to current plan).

    wp core update –version=4.9.8 –force

    There have been several “I hate the new editor” posts, but few people seem willing to go into specifics about why it’s lacking compared to the previous one. So I’m going to now:

    1) The writing space has been halved and replaced by… large expanses of blank space. Being only able to fit half a sentence per line is ludicrous on a 1080p display, let alone on higher-end systems.

    2) The ‘code view’ button has been hidden in a sidebar (the ‘visual editor’ button meanwhile is clearly visible in the upper righthand corner).

    3) The editing shortcuts like bold, italic, link, and so forth have been removed from code view.

    4) Adding internal links has been complicated and now requires clicking a second button after the first (as does making links open in a new page).

    5) Added categories no longer ‘bunch up’ at the top of the list after being added.

    These changes seem inexplicable and in no way necessary to facilitate the new ‘block’ system. They in fact seem specifically designed to punish anyone not editing on a mobile device.

    Moderator Samuel Wood (Otto)

    (@otto42)

    WordPress.org Admin

    @offkorn

    1. This is largely resolved by updating your theme. The theme has control over the editor styling, much as it has for many years. Themes should be adding editor styles to make the editor look the same as it does on the front of the site.

    2. The code view button has indeed been hidden, but then that’s because the desire is for people to use the new visual editor, and not to use the code view. The problem with the old editor was largely that people didn’t use it. The new editor is an attempt to remedy that situation.

    3. See 2.

    4. Adding internal links doesn’t take any extra button presses. You select the text you want, and hit the link button, and put in your link, and hit enter. Done. The lack of the new page is intentional as well, because target=_blank is bad for accessibility and you should generally not do that.

    5. The category listing is generally alphabetic, to make it easier to find categories. It is true that new categories go at the bottom of the listing, when you just added them, because that’s the most visual place to show them being added, right near the box where you added them.

    1) I’ve never installed an editor theme. All the themes I’ve seen only affect how the site looks when visited. I’ve seen editor plugins of course, but never had to install one to increase the available writing area since the writing area filled the available space by default.

    2)-3) Maybe don’t try and force people to do something they don’t want to do on their own websites? Code literacy is at all-time high, it only makes sense that people who know how to code want to actually make use of that knowledge.

    4) It does if you don’t know the link you want to add. Before that single button press got you directly to the internal link searching prompt. Target=_blank is fantastic: Why would I ever want someone to leave my site to check a reference? Far better to have that reference open in a new tab.

    5) That’s not what I was referring to. Say you have a category for ‘Games’ and then 20 subcategories for each type of game. Before if you added the Games tag and the last subcategory in the list, after you saved the draft that last category would now appear at the top of the list directly under ‘Games’ (it would stop being alphabetical). Now the subcategories stay in alphabetical order even after they’ve been added to a draft, which is a bit of pain when you want to quickly see which ones have been added while editing.

    • This reply was modified 4 days, 16 hours ago by  Offkorn.

    The Classic Editor will remain supported until end of 2021 (according to current plan).

    Then what happens?

    Moderator Samuel Wood (Otto)

    (@otto42)

    WordPress.org Admin

    I’ve never installed an editor theme

    There is no such thing as an “editor theme”. I mean the same thing you do when I say “theme”. Themes can add editor styles, and have been able to do so for many years. This is no different, and yes, good themes can and should style the editor. This goes for both the old editor as well as the new one.

    Maybe don’t try and force people to do something they don’t want to do on their own websites?

    Sorry, but the simple answer to this is “no”. The idea of requiring the user to switch back and forth between the easy editor and the “raw code view” is simply crazy talk. The whole purpose of the new editor is to allow regular people, who don’t know code, who don’t want to know code, to be able to make beautiful content as well. Making the code view easy would defeat the purpose. This isn’t “forcing” anything, this is simply acknowledging that this new editor is intended to be used by everybody, all the time. You should not need to switch to the code view, because *nobody* should need to switch to the code view.

    It does if you don’t know the link you want to add. Before that single button press got you directly to the internal link searching prompt.

    It still does. That box where you can type in an external link? You can also just type a title and it will search internally for you, and provide a dropdown list of your internal links, in real time.

    Target=_blank is fantastic: Why would I ever want someone to leave my site to check a reference? Far better to have that reference open in a new tab.

    Nope. Target blank is bad for accessibility, bad for the web, bad for users, and bad for you. Please see the endless research on the topic elsewhere on the web: https://medium.com/the-metric/links-should-open-in-the-same-window-447da3ae59ba

    WordPress isn’t going to support clearly bad practices for the open web. If users want to open a new tab, then they know how to do that themselves. They can hold CTRL while clicking, or middle click, or right click and select the option from a menu.. There’s endless ways for users to decide what they want to do and how they want to browse. It is not the website’s job to choose this path for them. The only valid reason to use target=blank is if the user is in the middle of some activity like filling out a form, and you need a new window specifically to explain something. Then a new window makes sense, so that the activity is not interrupted. But just for having an external link? No, let the user use their browser in the way that makes them most comfortable.

    sexilyspeaking

    (@sexilyspeaking)

    I see a clearer picture.

    Guess the idea is you’re trying to make the editor more “user-friendly” to outdo portal like Wix etc.

    I think the idea is good but the way you implement it is flawed.

    I do agree with what you’re trying to achieve. For example, to create couple of columns, I gotta mess with some html/css, I imagine this is too much for most folks, if not impossible. However, what you’re introducing in 5.0 is not making things any better (as witnessed the complaints).

    Instead of introducing the Gutenberg editor which is confusing and not helping much, perhaps you should introduce a “Canvass Style Editor” with elements the classic editor visually and essentially intact – since folks already used to it (especially the HTML version for users like me).

    One way to achieve your objective is to make the whole backend even simpler, yet more productive.

    As mentioned, and instead of introducing the Gutenberg editor the way it is (which is kind of hopeless eg. I can’t even place a button on image, and it leaves behind a bunch “dirty” codes), perhaps you should introduce a “Canvass Style Editor” with elements of the classic editor visually and essentially intact – since folks already used to it (especially the HTML version for users like me).

    What I mean by “Canvass Editor” is essentially a “page builder” capable editor with bigger & cleaner UI. Provided you can achieve all that without comprising the performance, you should extend the functionality with an optional plugin (that will add icons/menu). The idea is offer a mimimal platform (yet robust) and let user choose to extend features & functions … the very reason why WP is so popular.

    And if you are going in that direction, might as well also look at making the WP Page-centric instead of blog-centric. Why? Hardly anyone needs a blog these days, especially if you targeting folks who use things like Wix. They need website, not a blog. So, try to deevelop WP core that not only offers all kind fancy elements (like page builder) but also capable to be scaled into a monster rivaling Amazon.

    The other aspect is mobile. I know responsive themes are aplenty. There remains a big gap between WP & the mobile world. If not because Google wanted contextual content, I believe blogs already cease to exist by now. Therefore, I think you should design WP as such that users can easily turn WP into some kind of “app” that mobile users can access regardless of plaform, especially IoS which is basically enemy of websites. I don’t really what … Best is independent of App Store, else, be an full fledged app.

    And make WP as such that folks can easily create all kind of content eg. games with “app” features & capability so that mobile users can consume the content/program directly on WP.

    I am not saying WP should create all the features and functions… No. Create a platform so that developers can offer the features and functions.

    First thing first, make WP ligther and faster. If that means you must ditch PHP, then do so by introducing an all new WP, but leave the present “classic” WP alone (so that you don’t kill the base due to unforeseen circumstances – Gutenberg is almost one such example).

    Good luck.

    Moderator Samuel Wood (Otto)

    (@otto42)

    WordPress.org Admin

    What I mean by “Canvass Editor” is essentially a “page builder” capable editor with bigger & cleaner UI. Provided you can achieve all that without comprising the performance, you should extend the functionality with an optional plugin (that will add icons/menu). The idea is offer a mimimal platform (yet robust) and let user choose to extend features & functions … the very reason why WP is so popular.

    What you’re seeing now is Phase 1. There are more phases to come. If you think this is the end of the grand plan, then you haven’t seen anything yet.

Viewing 15 replies - 1 through 15 (of 30 total)
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