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  • I have just updated to the new version of WP [12.7.2018] and found it to be a real poor version. Huge departure from the standards for blog posting, total change of the UI on blog posting and it plain and simply works like [ EXPLETIVE DELETED ].

    Paragraphing is impossible and it is extremely cumbersome to use.

    Please revert back.

    • This topic was modified 5 months, 2 weeks ago by  Jan Dembowski.
Viewing 15 replies - 16 through 30 (of 30 total)
  • If you think this is the end of the grand plan, then you haven’t seen anything yet.

    This is really scary!

    So it may get worse.

    • This reply was modified 5 months, 2 weeks ago by  voodoochill.
    Moderator James Huff

    (@macmanx)

    Volunteer Moderator 🚀

    That’s a pretty poor assumption.

    What Otto meant is that it will get better, that work on the new editor has not stopped. It will be refined, fixed, improved, expanded.

    Making it _worse_ would be ridiculous, so please don’t be scared about that. 🙂

    No. If this is the beginning of the “the grand plan” and it’s this bad for people, why would we assume that as the “grand plan” progresses, that it won’t get worse?

    Moderator James Huff

    (@macmanx)

    Volunteer Moderator 🚀

    Well, everyone is of course entitled to their own opinion.

    My personal outlook on that is, “Why would anyone ever willingly set a game plan to make something worse?”

    The WordPress developers have the best intentions, and they intend to follow through on that.

    What’s scary is that there appears to be two very divergent views as to what “better” means – is it “simple and easy” or “complex and cumbersome” – and that it appears the management of the WordPress future have chosen “complex and cumbersome.” Fortunately for us “simple and easy” guys, we appear to have 3 years to decide if the “complex and cumbersome” path is the future we want, or if we need to bail over to ClassicPress.

    Moderator James Huff

    (@macmanx)

    Volunteer Moderator 🚀

    Well, let me propose four things to think about there. And I’m not dismissing anything, just suggesting a bit of a thought experiment:

    1. What if “complex and cumbersome” became “simple and easy” within those 3 years?

    2. What if “simple and easy” is really nothing more than “familier,” and that given a small amount of time, “complex and cumbersome” will become “simpler and easier”? (this one was my own journey with the new editor)

    3. What if “simple and easy” and “complex and cumbersome” are not absolutes, what if the labels are interchangeable depending on who uses it? In other words, what if simple for one person is complex for another?

    4. How can you get involved to bring “simple and easy” to everyone out of the box? https://make.wordpress.org/

    You may be right, some people might find G simple and easy, and with enough usage even more folks might find it simple and easy. For those that don’t, or don’t have time for the learning curve, it’s good to have another option out there.

    It’s not just the editor usage that concerns me; another aspect of “complex and cumbersome” is the code base and the “horsepower” it takes to drive it. When I see “solutions” to performance issues like “get a better host” – that’s cause for concern about the future.

    I personally don’t find Gutenberg terribly onerous in the bit of exploring I’ve done, but certainly not intuitive. It will probably be less work/risk to learn G than move to ClassicPress, but I’ll stick with 4.9.8 for the foreseeable future and make that call when I’ve got time for either option.

    I do appreciate the volunteers that make WordPress possible.

    Moderator Samuel Wood (Otto)

    (@otto42)

    WordPress.org Admin

    When I see “solutions” to performance issues like “get a better host” – that’s cause for concern about the future.

    The editor largely runs in the browser, so the “host” being faster won’t make it any better or fix anything. It’s javascript, it runs on the client, not on the server.

    Now, there is a concern with usage of the REST API, but realistically, the issue there is going to be time-to-first-byte, and then yes, get-a-better-host definitely applies. However, in such a situation, your site is going to be super slow anyway, so that’s more of a general problem.

    I see.

    It’s javascript, it runs on the client,

    Interesting. You host the scripts like Google fonts?

    Care to share a little more? What is the ultimate goal?

    While it’s nice to have fancy features, hope you always keep performance in mind.

    • This reply was modified 5 months, 1 week ago by  Steven Stern.
    • This reply was modified 5 months, 1 week ago by  sexilyspeaking.
    Moderator Samuel Wood (Otto)

    (@otto42)

    WordPress.org Admin

    Interesting. You host the scripts like Google fonts?

    No, you do. Your site does. The editor is built into WordPress.

    Samuel Wood (Otto)

    Don’t think what you said makes sense…

    It’s javascript, it runs on the client,

    And then,

    No, you do. Your site does, host the scripts

    How can running the javascript not a burden if it’s hosted on my server? The user device will call the script from my server, right?

    Am I missing something here?

    Moderator Jan Dembowski

    (@jdembowski)

    Forum Moderator and Brute Squad

    @sexilyspeaking I’ve archived your reply here. Your account is flagged for moderation based on some of your, let’s euphemistically call it, less than productive comments.

    The flag does not prevent you from creating new posts or replying and you’re not banned. A moderator will need to approve them before anyone else can see them.

    When the moderators are satisfied that that behavior will not be repeated then the flag may come off your account.

    Moderator James Huff

    (@macmanx)

    Volunteer Moderator 🚀

    How can running the javascript not a burden if it’s hosted on my server? The user device will call the script from my server, right?

    JavaScript files are indeed retrieved from the server, but JavaScript is executed in the browser. That means that the processing and majority resource hit (which isn’t that much to be honest) is experienced on the device of the person using the editor, not the server.

    The only resource hit on the server in this sense is basically (and this is a very low-level explanation of the process) the browser downloading the JavaScript files from the server, which amounts to a few kilobytes of basically plaintext data.

    For more detail, I recommend reading up on how JavaScript functions, but in short the heavy lifting is done in the browser, not on the server.

    This is precisely why I always say, Keep WP Lighter & Faster.

    – Anything called from the server is a burden/delay, no matter how small.
    – Keep the core to bare minimal if you may. Especially on things that is not necessary.
    – There are already plenty in existing WP even without Gettenberg (pingdom/GTMetrix said so).
    – I agree the files are not that big, but it adds up.

    Hope you also look into performance in your future development.

    Moderator James Huff

    (@macmanx)

    Volunteer Moderator 🚀

    If a few extra kilobytes loaded from the server only by people using the editor is too much for your hosting provider, I recommend finding a new hosting provider. We have some recommended providers at https://wordpress.org/hosting/ who have absolutely no trouble with this.

    Load from the editor on a server should represent less than 1% of an average site’s overall load. In the most basic sense, your browser is just downloading a few kilobytes of plain text data from the server.

    No processing or execution is done on the server unless an interaction requires a database query (adding tags, saving a draft, publishing), in which case the load is no different than the old editor.

    JavaScript is pretty much the future of efficiency from a server resources standpoint. Executing JavaScript in the browser beats executing PHP over the server any day.

Viewing 15 replies - 16 through 30 (of 30 total)
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