Support » Plugin: Gutenberg » why?

  • frock

    (@frock)


    when my wordpress sites started automatically changing to the new block editor, i was not particularly pleased but i thought ok let’s give it a try and see what the benefits are. but after a couple of weeks of testing it out, i’m installing the classic editor plugin and returning with relief to the former interface.

    i can’t think of a single thing that the block editor makes easier for me. inserting and moving images is far less intuitive and easy than previously, when all i needed to do was put my cursor where i wanted the image and click on the add media button. if i decided it wasn’t in the right place, i could simply drag and drop the image into the new place. with blocks this isn’t possible. first i have to manually divide my text to make a new block, then i have to add a block, then add the image, then align it to make the text wrap around. then when i realise it should be further up or down in the text … not possible to simply drag and drop it!! not possible to use the arrows to move the image block up or down – because now it’s embedded into the text block. the only solution i found was to delete the image and then go through the process of reinserting it elsewhere. what a waste of time.

    i can’t see any benefit or reason for making paragraphs be separate blocks. maybe this is somehow easier for newbies, but it’s hard to imagine how, when most people are already familiar with text editor applications that resemble fairly closely the classic wordpress editor.

    i really cannot see how blocks offer any improvement over the normal kind of editor. and as someone who also works quite a lot with drupal, it introduces confusion as blocks in drupal are something else altogether. maybe this is where wordpress has taken the idea of “reuseable” content blocks from – but that shouldn’t mean that every bit of content becomes a block. i mean seriously, how often do you want to repeat the same paragraph of a blog post somewhere else?

    please make the block editor an option, not the default.

Viewing 10 replies - 1 through 10 (of 10 total)
  • vynome

    (@vynome)

    I totally agree with you. For most of our clients anything besides “MS Office” is too-hard-to-explain. Therefore they liked classic editor, because it worked almost like MS Word. I gues, that only a minority of WordPress users want to tailor each post in terms of DTP. For the vast majority it works fine like classic word editor and creators of WordPress should totally count with such situation.

    i mean seriously, how often do you want to repeat the same paragraph of a blog post somewhere else?(sic)

    With all due respect, the use case you mention is overly simplistic, but how about this: three paragraphs – one with your name, other with social icons, other with your short bio, one picture on the left, bundle all four as a reusable block and label it as an author box…a-há! now you have a useful reusable block that can include in every post. Bonus benefit: one less plugin in your site.

    frock

    (@frock)

    perhaps useful for some people – but it doesn’t justify making the entire editing interface into blocks.

    Three paragraphs – one with your name, other with social icons, other with your short bio, one picture on the left, bundle all four as a reusable block and label it as an author box…a-há! now you have a useful reusable block that can include in every post.

    This is exactly what many themes offer as an author box. It’s actually not the brightest idea to implement this kind of information individually on the editor-level. A good developer can create this feature for a customer in less than 30 minutes.

    Yes, end-users can now do this without the help of a pro. To what end? Unprofessional websites, I guess.

    @cutu234

    Look, it’s very simple: my point was going from “why should I repeat a paragraph somewhere else” to show how the feature can be used in a meaningful way.

    Better now?

    It was not to make StarBox obsolete, or about being unprofessional (don’t know how you arrived there BTW).

    It was a poor example to be honest. You mention StarBox, which has 10k active installations and compare it to a new ‘feature’ that 3 million (and counting) users will never even use.

    Every client I work for has the ‘classic editor plugin’ installed and for the most part together with the WPBakery plugin.

    And I do get what Cutu234 is saying about unprofessional websites, but I reckon so do you.

    • This reply was modified 2 weeks, 6 days ago by  snewpers.

    @snewpers

    It was a poor example to be honest.

    Ok then. I would love to provide a better example, but we both know that whatever that is, you’re not going to like it, right?

    You mention StarBox, which has 10k active installations and compare it to a new ‘feature’ that 3 million (and counting) users will never even use. (sic)

    So, you use 100% of WordPress? WP Bakery? all software has features that some will put to use, some don’t. Regarding those 3M, I say this to everyone: don’t believe that anyone that installs Classic Editor or Disable Gutenberg effectively doesn’t use Gutenberg; I love Gutenberg and have Disable Gutenberg active. Why? because I set it up to use my WordPress in dual mode, that is, Classic Editor for old posts that were created with it, and for everything new Gutenberg is the one I use.

    Every client I work for has the ‘classic editor plugin’ installed and for the most part together with the WPBakery plugin.

    All my clients use Gutenberg. 😉

    Anecdotal facts have little use here.

    For those of us who are NOT professional web developers…just professionals wanting to get our info out into the world…will you please (frock or anyone else) give me the Fix-it-for-Dummies instructions on how to extricate myself from the hell of blocks? (I realize it’s a plugin, but please point me as if I’m a 3rd-grader.)

    I found this thread by searching for the can’t-scroll-down-long-paragraph-blocks issue. Frankly, I feel like (and have for pretty much most the time I’ve had my site, over 7 years), who do I have to **** to get OUT of WordPress?! A couple years ago I was on the brink of decamping and moving to Squarespace, but it was just going to be more $$ than I could justify (and my business simply isn’t image-centric enough), now that I’m mostly retired from that career and on to another, which is an IRL, offline situation.

    So if any of y’all feel like you have advice that can help me in that regard (the fact that I still have a trickle of subscribers wanting my information, and I want to keep my site if only for archive purposes…but I’m completely upside-down in terms of the cost of maintaining it, not to mention the PITA that is the topic of this thread), I’d certainly welcome it. TIA!

    hi marcy,
    i have resolved my frustrations with blocks by installing the classic editor plugin: https://wordpress.org/plugins/classic-editor/

    it simply takes you back to the familiar old editor interface & i’m using it on several different wordpress sites with no problems at all.

    but if you are keeping your site only for archive purposes and not planning to keep adding to it or updating it, then i would recommend that you export it to static html. this will mean you don’t need to keep doing updates to wordpress or plugins, & it will stay the same for the foreseeable future. you will need to host it somewhere, but if it’s not a big site then you should be able to find a cheap place to park it. there are plugins that will turn your wordpress site into a static site, i have not done this yet myself so i can’t recommend anything, but i expect i will do it in the not too distant future with a site for a project that is finished. there’s usually no need to have a dynamic CMS for an archived site.

    Thanks so much for this, frock! (Unfortunately, the word I used, “archive,” was ill-chosen. I do keep trickling new blog posts on a very sporadic basis, and subscribers keep opting in to my list via the free gift on the site. And, it’s not small.)

Viewing 10 replies - 1 through 10 (of 10 total)
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