This plugin hasn’t been updated in over 2 years. It may no longer be maintained or supported and may have compatibility issues when used with more recent versions of WordPress.

yaCAPTCHA

Description

yaCAPTCHA is a CAPTCHA plugin for WordPress that helps you block comment spam
from automated bots. In order to post comments, users will have to write down
the characters that are part of an image. Since it is relatively hard for
automated programs to figure out those characters, this will help prevent
comment spam from those programs.

Requirements

  • WordPress 1.5 or higher.
  • PHP 4.1.0 or higher with GD2 library support.
  • Theme must support the ‘comment_form’ action.
  • PHP sessions enabled and properly configured.

In case you are wondering, most hosting providers should have those basic
requirements in place.

Strengths vs other solutions

  • Easy to install
  • Does not require Javascript to work
  • Broad WordPress version support

Thanks

Thanks to Kruglov Sergei for creating KCAPTCHA, his pretty good CAPTCHA. You
can visit KCAPTCHA website here.

Screenshots

  • The comment form with the default theme.
  • A sample CAPTCHA image (1).
  • A sample CAPTCHA image (2).
  • A sample CAPTCHA image (3).
  • A sample CAPTCHA image (4).

Installation

  1. To install the plugin, you must first copy the directory yacaptcha in your
    WordPress plugin directory which must be /wp-content/plugins/. If you are using
    Wordpress 2.7 or higher, you can simply use the plugin installer in your
    site admin section, search for yaCAPTCHA and click on install or upload the zip
    file.
  2. After the installation, you need to go in your site admin, in the Plugins
    section and activate the yaCAPTCHA plugin.

It should works flawlessly with the default theme.

Optional intallation steps

  • For WordPress version lower than 3.0, the default theme and most themes
    place the additionnal comment form items after the submit button. I suggest you
    change it so that it appears before the submit button. Have a look at the
    “How can I customize it?” section in the FAQ. This is not necessary if you are
    using version 3.0 or a higher version of WordPress.
  • The default WordPress settings regarding comment appearance should be tweaked
    with this plugin. I suggest you uncheck these two options: “An administrator
    must always approve the comment” and “Comment author must have a previously
    approved comment” in the Discussion Settings, “Before a comment appears” area.

FAQ

How can I customize it?

For WordPress version lower than 3.0, you can change the location of the
CAPTCHA field within the comment form by changing the location of the
‘comment_form’ call in your theme’s comments.php file. The CAPTCHA field
appears at the same location as the ‘comment_form’ call. The default location
for the ‘comment_form’ call can make it confusing for some people because the
CAPTCHA will appear after the submit button. I suggest you change it so that it
appears before the submit button. This is not necessary if you are using
version 3.0 or a higher version of WordPress.

You can customize the messages that are shown by changing the content of
$yaCaptchaCharInputMsg, $yaCaptchaCharNoMatchMsg and
$yaCaptchaCharAlternateCaptchaText in the yacaptcha.php file. The default
messages should be good enough for most English blogs.

You can customize the HTML code that is used in the comment section to match
your theme preferences by changing the code in the yaCaptchaCommentForm
function for WordPress version lower than 3.0 and in the
yaCaptchaCommentFormAfterFields function for WordPress version 3.0 or higher in
the yacaptcha.php file. The default HTML code match the default WordPress
theme.

You can customize the image properties like how many characters are shown or
which characters are used by changing values in the kcaptcha_config.php
file. The default values should be good enough for most people.

I cannot see the CAPTCHA when I am logged in

The CAPTCHA is not shown and it is not validated for logged in users. It
assumes that logged in users are already validated and they will not post
spam.

It does not work!

First, make sure that you meet all the requirements. If you are still
having problems, you can contact me.

Contributors & Developers

“yaCAPTCHA” is open source software. The following people have contributed to this plugin.

Contributors

Translate “yaCAPTCHA” into your language.

Interested in development?

Browse the code or subscribe to the development log by RSS.

Changelog

1.5

(July 11th, 2010): Updated to work with WordPress 3.0 and the default theme.
Plugin documentation update. Minor code refactoring.

1.4

(April 25th, 2010): Updated to work with WordPress 2.9 . Minor plugin
documentation update.

1.3.1

(October 19th, 2009): Tested to work with WordPress 2.8.4 and the default
theme. Even though it was not said to be tested with WordPress 2.8.x before,
version 1.3 should have been working correctly for those who tried it. Minor
plugin documentation update.

1.3

(January 28th, 2009): Tested to work with WordPress 1.5 and the default theme.
Tested to work with WordPress 2.7 and the default theme. Some code refactoring.
Updated plugin documentation.

1.2.2

(January 19th, 2009): Changed files and directories structure to make it work
with the new upgrading/installation process.

1.2.1

(January 19th, 2009): Changed files and directories structure to make it work
with the new upgrading/installation process. Updated plugin documentation.

1.2

(January 17th, 2009): Tested to work with WordPress 2.7 and the default theme.
Removed the redirection after an invalid CAPTCHA (bug fix for 2.7). Updated
plugin documentation.

1.1

(August 5th, 2008): Tested to work with WordPress 2.6 and the default theme.

1.0

(May 11th, 2008): Updated the CAPTCHA generator, KCAPTCHA, to the latest
version. Tested to work with WordPress 2.5.1 and the default theme.

0.9

(February 11th, 2008): Make all file cases lower to prevent potential problems.
Remove CAPTCHA for logged users.

0.8

(February 9th, 2008): Initial version. Should work flawlessly with WordPress
2.3.2 and the default theme.