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!This plugin hasn't been updated in over 2 years. It may no longer be maintained or supported and may have compatibility issues when used with more recent versions of WordPress.

WP Log in Browser

Allows you to log data from your PHP WordPress code to your browser's console. Annoyed you can't var_dump from an AJAX handler? Not anymore

I'm working on a nice admin screen to config auto-logging of some common things (like wp_query in pre_get_posts and wp), and some other goodies.

To log things manually, you can use:

browser()->log  ( $var, $label );
browser()->warn ( $var, $label );
browser()->info ( $var, $label );
browser()->error( $var, $label );

Also, commandas are chainable:

browser()->log( 'This is a log...' )->error( '...and this is an error' );

For example, to log all your main query's query_vars:

add_filter( 'pre_get_posts', 'log_wp_query', 10000 );

function log_wp_query( $query ) {
    if ( $query->is_main_query() )
        browser()->log( $query->query_vars, 'pre_get_posts' );

    return $query;
}

Filters

wplinb-match-wp-debug: Set to true to only log when wp_debug is true. To prevent logging when wp_debug is false:

add_filter( 'wplinb-match-wp-debug', '__return_true' );

wplinb-enabled: To disable logging completely. It takes precedence over wplinb-match-wp-debug. To disable logging:

add_filter( 'wplinb-enabled', '__return_false' );

Profiling

The plugin includes a really simple function to allow you to track execution time of different parts of your code.

browser()->timer( $key, $log = false );

The first time you call this function with a given $key (string) it will start a timer, and return false. You can start as many timers as you want, using different $key values. You can ignore the second parameter for this first call.

The second time you call this function with a given $key, it will return the ellapsed time in seconds since you started this $key timer. If you set the second parameter to true, it will also log this value to the browser.

Example 1: Sequential use, log manually.

browser()->timer( 'Mega loop' );
for ( $i = 0; $i < 1000000; $i++ ) {
    //do something
}
$time = browser()->timer( 'Mega loop' );
browser()->log( $time, 'The mega loop took:' );

Example 2: Start and end in different places, log automatically.

add_action( 'posts_selection', 'start_timer', 100 );
add_filter( 'the_posts', 'end_timer', 1, 2 );

function start_timer( $query ) {
    browser()->timer( 'Main query time' );
}

function end_timer( $posts, $query ) {
    browser()->timer( 'Main query time', true );
    return $posts;
}

This is not a good way of measuring how much time a query takes to run, it's just to illustrate how to use the timer.

In exactly the same way, you can use the function

Browser()->memory( $key, $log = false );

to measure delta of memory consumption from your first call and your second call with the same $key.

Example:

Browser()->memory( 'testing' );
$test = array();
for ( $i = 0; $i < 100; $i++ ) {
    $test[$i] = md5( rand( 1, $i ) );
}
Browser()->memory( 'testing', true );

Browser()->memory( 'testing' );
$test = array();
for ( $i = 0; $i < 10000; $i++ ) {
    $test[$i] = md5( rand( 1, $i ) );
}
Browser()->memory( 'testing', true );

Requires: 3.4 or higher
Compatible up to: 3.5.2
Last Updated: 2012-12-17
Active Installs: 40+

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