Schemify

Description

Structured data allows developers and publishers to mark up content in a way that it’s easy for machines to understand. Proper use of structured data enables third-parties like Google to parse reviews, event data, and contact information in meaningful ways, ensuring you’re getting the most “bang” out of your publishing buck.

Fortunately, the major players in the Search game, including Google, Microsoft, Yahoo!, and Yandex) came together in the early 2010s to form Schema.org, a collaborative, community-driven standard for structured data.

With the major search engines and communities behind it, we’re all marking up everything with appropriate structured data now, right?

Unfortunately, the process of implementing Schema.org in a site — especially one driven by dynamic content — is less than straightforward. WordPress, for instance, powers roughly a quarter of the web, but implementing structured data across hundreds of thousands of themes would be a nightmare.

Or, at least it would be, if it weren’t for Schemify.

What does Schemify do?

There are two approaches to adding structured data to a website: via the markup or JSON for Linking Data (JSON-LD).

Consider the following author information, which might appear at the bottom of a blog post:

    
        
        Steve Grunwell
        

Steve is the Director of Technology at Growella. When he's not working, you can find him speaking at conferences, roasting coffee, or spending time with his wife and daughter

If I wanted this information to use Schema.org markup, it would look something like this:

    
        
        Steve Grunwell
        

Steve is the Director of Technology at Growella. When he's not working, you can find him speaking at conferences, roasting coffee, or spending time with his wife and daughter

While that may not seem like a lot of work, that’s still a lot of extra markup being added. Even worse, a lot of that markup might normally be generated by WordPress helper functions like get_avatar(), which means extra work to get the necessary itemprop attribute in place.

Fortunately, the other approach for adding structured data is much more straight-forward in a theme, as it’s simply a JSON-LD object:

    
    {
        "@context": "http://schema.org",
        "@type": "Person",
        "name": "Steve Grunwell",
        "url": "https://stevegrunwell.com",
        "image": "https://secure.gravatar.com/avatar/88ea4e10ed968136228545d7112d82cb?s=200",
        "description": "Steve is the Director of Technology at Growella. When he's not working, you can find him speaking at conferences, roasting coffee, or spending time with his wife and daughter"
    }
    

We simply generate this JSON-LD object and append it to our document’s <body>. When Google or anyone else who supports JSON-LD structured data parses our page, they can immediately understand that Steve Grunwell is a person and determine his website, avatar, and biography.

The best part? There’s no need to change the markup within our theme!

Schemify aims to automate the generation of JSON-LD objects for content within WordPress. Its flexible structure and reasonable defaults enables drop-in support for structured data, regardless of the WordPress theme.

Installation

After uploading Schemify to your WordPress instance, activate it via the Plugins screen in wp-admin.

Reviews

As advertised

Adding schema to a site no longer has to be an afterthought. This plugin took our structured data game to the next level and I look forward to seeing how it helps improve our search ranking!

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Contributors & Developers

“Schemify” is open source software. The following people have contributed to this plugin.

Contributors

“Schemify” has been translated into 2 locales. Thank you to the translators for their contributions.

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Interested in development?

Browse the code, check out the SVN repository, or subscribe to the development log by RSS.

Changelog

0.1.0

  • Initial public release.