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Viewing 15 replies - 16 through 30 (of 232 total)
  • Yes, you need a Google Analytics account to view your stats on the web, but don’t just sign up using the sign up form. You need to sign in with the account originally used to setup Analytics on your blog.

    Unfortunately, there isn’t anyway to tell what Google account is linked with your Analytics data. That, you’re just going to have to either track down the person who originally setup your website, or do some detective work and see if you have any email from Google mentioning the account.

    The good news is once you know the Google account used to setup Analytics on your website, you can login to Google Analytics using that account and give your normal Google account access to your Analytics. That way you don’t have to switch between accounts.

    Good luck finding the account!

    Interesting suggestion, but did you consider caching? By being an external resource, the Javascript is only downloaded once by the browser. On the next page load the browser already has it, so it doesn’t need to download another 927 bytes.

    You technically don’t need to do anything. Both of the additional tracking fields are for for adding extra bits of code to the tracking script, for certain kinds of custom Analytics reporting. If you don’t know what the fields are for, you don’t need to use them.

    I’ve been doing testing, and I unfortunately cannot replicate the missing dashboard widget. My recommendations would be to update to the latest nightly (I’ve been testing with 3.0-beta2-14960), and update to GA 6.1.1 when released later today. Perhaps the dashboard widget file never uploaded correctly on your install and replacing it with a new version will solve the issue.

    I just checked out your blog, and I do have to agree with what macmanx is saying.

    From a technical standpoint, the Google Analytics tracking script is installed correctly and is reporting visits to Analytics, since you are seeing new stats come in each day. If the issue was only with the widget and the Analytics website was reporting something differently, I would say there is a problem, but the Analytics website is almost always accurate.

    Speaking from experience, blog traffic is most certainly related to post frequency. Most readers come from RSS feeds, and without new posts, they’re simply not visiting the blog. On top of that, Google search has become much more time sensitive in the past year, especially with blog results, so without updated content, blogs tend to fall in the search results fairly quickly.

    Can you elaborate more? I’m a little confused by what you’re saying.

    Are you seeing this fluctuation in the dashboard widget, analytics.google.com, or both? How big of a change is this?

    Hopefully not. I do know some work was being done recently to the dashboard section, so perhaps a few 3.0 nightlies have this functionality broken.

    I have a GA release scheduled for later this week that will contain a few bug fixes. I’ll be sure to test against the latest 3.0 nightly and see if I can find anything wrong with the dashboard widget.

    I have received a ton of requests for this feature before, and it is very high on the top of my list for new features. In fact, I really want this feature myself, so I can assure you the feature is coming.

    Right now my holdup has been the initial system I designed to access the Analytics API isn’t that great. Caching support is extremely limited, and overall isn’t a great system to expand into future API uses.

    I have a new system prototyped out that will solve the caching issues with the current system, while allowing retrieval of any stat. My vision for the future is this system will allow anyone to include any stat in their theme through a simple function call like:

    ga_get_postStat($post_id, 'views', '30');

    Unfortunately, my life has been kind of crazy lately, so I haven’t had a lot of time to put into Google Analyticator. I just graduated college, and I’m still hunting for a job, so once I get that sorted out, I’ll be back in the plugin game. Thanks for the request.

    In the mean time, I do have an experimental function to grab the viewcount, but it lacks caching and will most certainly disappear once I get the proper system up and running. Look at google-analyticator.php. The function should be one of the last ones at the bottom.

    BTW, you list your WordPress version as 3.02. WordPress 3.0 hasn’t even been released yet. I’m assuming that’s a mistake/typo, but I ask because WordPress versions earlier than 2.8 do not have widgets enabled.

    Alright, next area to check would be in Google Analyticator’s settings. One of the last available options is one to disable the widgets. Are the widgets disabled there?

    If you’re running 6.1, yes, the tracking code is in the header, but this is by design. 6.x uses a new version of Google tracking code called async tracking.

    Basically, instead of loading the tracking code in order with the page (like previous versions of the tracking code), the tracking code is loaded in parallel at the same time. A browser visiting a page with the async tracking code will load both the page and the tracking code at the same time without conflicting. This means that even if Google’s servers fail, the page content will load just as fast as if the code was not even on the page.

    The reason for now placing this code in the header is it increases the reliability of ensuring visitors are tracked. Previous versions of the code could miss visitors if they navigated away from the page before everything loads. Since there are no issues with slowing the page like previous versions of the code, the tracking code is placed at the top to give it a higher chance of loading before navigating away.

    You can read more about the async tracking code here: http://code.google.com/apis/analytics/docs/tracking/asyncTracking.html

    Is the widget just invisible? Hit the screen options button on the top right and see if Google Analytics Summary is unchecked.

    If you’re running 6.1, yes, the tracking code is in the header, but this is by design. 6.x uses a new version of Google tracking code called async tracking.

    Basically, instead of loading the tracking code in order with the page (like previous versions of the tracking code), the tracking code is loaded in parallel at the same time. A browser visiting a page with the async tracking code will load both the page and the tracking code at the same time without conflicting. This means that even if Google’s servers fail, the page content will load just as fast as if the code was not even on the page.

    The reason for now placing this code in the header is it increases the reliability of ensuring visitors are tracked. Previous versions of the code could miss visitors if they navigated away from the page before everything loads. Since there are no issues with slowing the page like previous versions of the code, the tracking code is placed at the top to give it a higher chance of loading before navigating away.

    You can read more about the async tracking code here: http://code.google.com/apis/analytics/docs/tracking/asyncTracking.html

    Thanks for the clarification that this worked fine before the update. I have an idea now of what’s breaking the function, and I apologize for not completely testing that function.

    Right now, I’m planning on releasing a bug fix this weekend at the latest with any bugs that have cropped up since release. I will make sure this is fixed for that release, and if I have any trouble reproducing the issue, I’ll respond back here.

    For now, I believe the issue is related to a variable not being set. By setting $_POST[‘token’] to the token found in your database, it should solve the issue if you’re looking for a temporary workaround.

    For the future, I do have a much better stat system planned that will make getting stats like page visits and other API data a breeze with themes. The system is prototyped out; it’s just a matter of finding time to code it. When I do get around to writing the code, would you be interested in helping beta test the new system?

    This also points to the experimental function get_analytics_visits_by_page. How are you using this function?

Viewing 15 replies - 16 through 30 (of 232 total)