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Viewing 15 replies - 1 through 15 (of 249 total)
  • Ah, that was the problem! I had styled .cc-revoke with !important for the positioning attributes, but had not thought to do so for the colors. I think that did the trick. Thank you!

    Ate Up With Motor

    (@ate-up-with-motor)

    Okay, thanks!

    If possible, it would also be helpful if there were a way to allow reopening the revocable consent notice with a keyboard shortcut, so that users can do that as well.

    Ate Up With Motor

    (@ate-up-with-motor)

    Yes, I figured that, but what are the classes that determine the revocable notice styling? I tried assigning colors to .cc-revoke, but that had no effect, and there’s some kind of “override” class whose function I don’t understand (it has a numeric code that changes on each refresh). Even after looking at it with Inspect Element, I’m not sure what styles I need to assign to affect the revocable notice itself.

    Ate Up With Motor

    (@ate-up-with-motor)

    Ah, okay — I misunderstood the extent of the new hooks. (I’m not a developer, so a lot of that stuff is only marginally comprehensible to me.) That would explain why I haven’t seen any way to do it (in plugins, either). Thanks for taking the time to clarify it for me!

    Ate Up With Motor

    (@ate-up-with-motor)

    I had thought WordPress 5.3 now had that functionality, according to this post:

    Use aria-label to ensure Posts and Comments navigation has proper context in WordPress 5.3

    … which says, “All these functions [including the_posts_pagination()] now implement aria_label parameter which can be used to pass custom value for the related HTML attribute.”

    I don’t understand the functions well enough to actually implement that, but it implies it’s now possible, although it’s also entirely possible I may be misunderstanding that post.

    Ate Up With Motor

    (@ate-up-with-motor)

    Possibly. Hmm — I will double-check.

    Ate Up With Motor

    (@ate-up-with-motor)

    Okay, but HOW does one implement those parameters? I’m not a developer, and the function references make very little sense. I can recreate components in a child theme or add functions if they aren’t too complicated, but I’d need a tutorial or some coherent examples to figure out how to make any sense of those function references.

    I did some web searches and found no tutorials for this, on WordPress or elsewhere, and none of the “accessibility-ready” themes on WordPress.org appear to have implemented those parameters.

    Ate Up With Motor

    (@ate-up-with-motor)

    Is this something that I can add into an existing theme with functions, or does it require building a new theme? I’ve been combing through “accessibility-ready” themes in the repository; none of them seem to add pagination labels out of the box, and I haven’t the first clue how I would add them without building a new theme (which I am not at all qualified to do).

    Ate Up With Motor

    (@ate-up-with-motor)

    For my reference, though, if I did want to change the skiplink colors, is it possible to do that within the plugin? If so, how do I need to add the CSS?

    Ate Up With Motor

    (@ate-up-with-motor)

    Okay, that makes sense. I realize tools like this can be inflexible on stuff like that.

    It seems like the Google Analytics Germanized banner is the bigger issue. Fortunately, it’s set to opt-in, so if a user doesn’t click, the analytics script doesn’t fire at all, so it’s an annoyance rather than a privacy issue, but it’s still a problem. Unfortunately, fixing it is way beyond me, so I left a comment for the developers. (Thank you SO much for bringing that to my attention — neither Opena11y Toolkit nor the WebAIM add-on identified that problem!)

    Ate Up With Motor

    (@ate-up-with-motor)

    Yikes — I will inform the developers, as that’s beyond my scope.

    This test I did was using the Opena11y Toolkit browser extension for Firefox (https://addons.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/addon/opena11y-toolkit/?src=search), which places the a11y script onscreen and highlights problems, with annotated suggestions.

    Ate Up With Motor

    (@ate-up-with-motor)

    I’m concerned about this as well — it’s a potential accessibility issue because it could confuse screen readers.

    Ate Up With Motor

    (@ate-up-with-motor)

    I just want to append to what Mr. Godley says that while California law is to some extent GDPR-inspired, its definitions and standards are in some ways distinctly different — less stringent in certain respects, significantly more onerous in others. Again, I’m not a lawyer, but I would caution any WordPress user not to assume that GDPR compliance is CCPA-compliant or vice versa. (Complying with one will put you in a better position to comply with the other, but each has unique requirements.)

    As far as I understand it, the GDPR doesn’t prohibit collecting information for security and troubleshooting purposes, and my non-lawyer’s interpretation is that whatever information Redirection collects falls into that category, particularly if you configure your settings so you only retain the information as long as you reasonably need it and are upfront in your privacy policy about what information you collect.

    Ate Up With Motor

    (@ate-up-with-motor)

    I’m not in the EU or a lawyer (nor I assume is Mr. Godley), and the finer points of the GDPR are beyond my ken.

    On the surface, it does not appear that the counter or last access dates collect anything the GDPR would deem personally identifying information. (The Redirection logs do, since they collect IP addresses and user agent data.)

    It’s a muddier question under California law because California law has a very broad definition of “personal information” that also encompasses virtually any information or inferences about an individual’s web browsing or online activity. I have a hard time envisioning a hit counter being deemed personal information even by that expansive standard. However, the last-access date might enable you to determine what outdated link a specific visitor clicked on, which might be deemed to constitute online behavioral information. (Whether the state will actually interpret the law that broadly is unclear, and I don’t think it’s a reasonable interpretation, but the breadth of the statutory definitions is truly bonkers.)

    I don’t know if the GDPR regards information about a user’s online behavior to be personally identifying in the absence of some actually identifying data like an IP address. That might come down to how individual member states decide to implement the regulations, and is really a legal question nobody here is in a position to answer for certain.

    In any event, the function above will disable the last-access date collection and prevent redirections from incrementing the counter, so you can turn it off that way.

    Ate Up With Motor

    (@ate-up-with-motor)

    Unfortunately, I have not. It seems to be at least partially theme-specific (I have a site with the Astra theme that is NOT having this problem).

    If I understand her correctly, I believe what Joy was saying was that the issue was caused by a scroll-to-top script (rather than such a script fixing it). That seems to be what’s happening to me — it looks like the anchor link resolves correctly and then some script overrides it and sends it back to the top of the page. Once the user is ON that page, the anchor links function normally, even if they hit refresh/reload or just hit return in the address bar.

Viewing 15 replies - 1 through 15 (of 249 total)