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Viewing 15 replies - 1 through 15 (of 29 total)
  • Thread Starter Anthony Butler

    (@abutlwer)

    That’s great – I have submitted a bug report. In the meantime I have eliminated the PHP warning by deleting the items Title and Page from the SEO title in the Yoast Date archives setting – and substituting the plain text ‘Date Archive’.

    Thread Starter Anthony Butler

    (@abutlwer)

    Thank you for your very prompt response.  The PHP warning appears in the WordPress debug.log file.  We run our test system with debugging set:

    define(‘WP_DEBUG’, true); 
    if (WP_DEBUG) {
        define(‘WP_DEBUG_LOG’, true);   
        define(‘WP_DEBUG_DISPLAY’, false);     
    }

    Hope this helps.  The error seems to be something to do with Yoast SEO internationalisation – requesting translation of a zero month number when no translation is required because the ‘2019’ in the URI cucrc.org/test/?m=2019 is already ‘translated’ and there is no month number present to be translated.

    For some reason, three PHP warning messages appear for each load of the page. When I do a trace – using get_queried_object_id() – the current object is returned as 0.

    Thread Starter Anthony Butler

    (@abutlwer)

    Problem resolved. Misunderstanding of what is loaded on which pages. Anthony

    Thread Starter Anthony Butler

    (@abutlwer)

    Yes, I thought something deep was going on! Here is my workaround – which is for flowing text beside and underneath an image, and is not directly concerned with Custom CSS.

    1. First add the image beside and below which text is to flow, selecting right or left alignment as required and adding Custom CSS to reduce margins and padding of the image and its caption if desired. (I like text to be fairly ‘tight’ at the top and bottom of an image when text is flowing around.)

    2. Add the paragraphs that are to flow around the image – they will flow correctly without any explicit action.

    3. If an item, such as a heading, that clears floats comes before the image space is completely taken up, crop the height of the image as much as possible to reduce its vertical space – and put up with any remaining white space.

    Hope this may help someone else.

    Thread Starter Anthony Butler

    (@abutlwer)

    Hi Hardeep

    I have discovered that divselector in the Custom CSS works and produces div.ticss-12345678 in the code.

    Not sure where this leaves things – perhaps an explanation in the documentation is what is required (although div.selector is more easily understood).

    Regards, Anthony

    Thread Starter Anthony Butler

    (@abutlwer)

    Hi Hardeep

    Here is a link which shows what I get when I attempt to edit the page in the block editor:
    View of block confusion in Visual editor
    The page displays OK in the code editor and also displays OK on the website:
    Problem page on test website

    As you can see, just one big block is displayed for the two ‘float left’ paragraphs and the ‘float right’ image – and the block incorporates the next (h3) heading on the page. It is no longer possible to access the individual paragraphs or the image – though one can alter the text of the heading.

    I have discovered a workaround. Insert the image just before the material that is to go to its left and use the standard block editor facility to right-align the image. This set up a div block, so one can then use div.selector in the custom CSS to style the figure and the figcaption. Getting tid of the double dots (..) remains an issue.

    Hope this helps, Anthony

    Thread Starter Anthony Butler

    (@abutlwer)

    Have done some further testing, trying out a lot of alternative arrangements. The declaration of ‘float: left/right;’ in the Custom CSS definitely seems to be the cause of the ‘block confusion’ I am experiencing in the Visual editor. Once ‘float’ appears in the Custom CSS, no amount of juggling can separate the blocks that get confounded.

    Hope this helps, Anthony

    Thread Starter Anthony Butler

    (@abutlwer)

    The block navigator has the same confusion problem, unfortunately. Here is a a minimal test file that will display the problem.

    <!-- wp:heading {"level":3} -->
    <h3>Are You Competitive?</h3>
    <!-- /wp:heading -->
    
    <!-- wp:paragraph -->
    <p>If you’re starting your studies this October and want to take part in Cambridge team racing in dinghies, this is the CUCrC section you’re looking for! This page should give you a taste of what the Blues sailing teams do and tell you all about Cambridge team racing. The Team Racing Section also provides the University’s Match Racing teams</p>
    <!-- /wp:paragraph -->
    
    <!-- wp:heading {"level":3} -->
    <h3>UK University Team Racing</h3>
    <!-- /wp:heading -->
    
    <!-- wp:paragraph {"className":"ticss-18d62dad","hasCustomCSS":true,"customCSS":".ticss-18d62dad {\n  max-width: 70% !important;\n  float: left !important;\n}"} -->
    <p class="ticss-18d62dad">Most organised university sailing in the UK is team racing. A team race involves two teams of three boats. The winning team is that with the best combined position across the finish line (add up the positions and 10 or less wins the race). Team race courses are small, meaning that each race lasts just 6 to 12 minutes. All of this amounts to an extremely exciting and tactical form of racing. At an event, there will generally be 8 to 24 teams entered, with an initial round robin followed by a knock-out stage.</p>
    <!-- /wp:paragraph -->
    
    <!-- wp:image {"id":1402,"sizeSlug":"large","className":"ticss-7fa6d98b","hasCustomCSS":true,"customCSS":".ticss-7fa6d98b {\n  float: right !important;\n}\nfigure.ticss-7fa6d98b {\n  max-width: 30% !important;\n  margin-top: 0 !important;\n  margin-bottom: 0 !important;\n  padding-left: 0.5em !important;\n}\nfigure.ticss-7fa6d98b \u003e figcaption {\n  max-width: 98% !important;\n  margin-top: 0 !important;\n  margin-bottom: 0 !important;\n  padding-top: 0.2em !important;\n  padding-bottom: 0.2em !important;\n}"} -->
    <figure class="wp-block-image size-large ticss-7fa6d98b"><img src="http://www.cucrc.org/test/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/TRBUSAGybe.jpg" alt="Photo of dinghies sailing" class="wp-image-1402"/><figcaption>Cambridge prepare to gybe at BUSA - with Southampton well trapped outside them</figcaption></figure>
    <!-- /wp:image -->
    
    <!-- wp:paragraph {"className":"ticss-98db6756","hasCustomCSS":true,"customCSS":".ticss-98db6756 {\n  max-width: 70% !important;\n  float: left !important;\n}"} -->
    <p class="ticss-98db6756">Find out more by viewing the&nbsp;<a rel="noreferrer noopener" href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Team_racing" target="_blank">Wikipedia article on team racing</a>. Also read the excellent book ‘Team Racing Companion’ (ISBN 978-1-909911-11-6) by Chris Atkins – a Blue in all his 3 years and captain of the victorious 1977 varsity team.</p>
    <!-- /wp:paragraph -->
    
    <!-- wp:heading {"level":3} -->
    <h3>Team Racing Boats</h3>
    <!-- /wp:heading -->
    
    <!-- wp:paragraph -->
    <p>Currently, the boat of choice for team racing in the UK is the Firefly. These are 12ft two-man fibreglass dinghies that are highly manoeuvrable. This makes them excellent for tactical team racing moves – obstructing the opposition to let your team mates through. Fireflies are also easily handled and crewed by ladies. CUCrC has two relatively new flights of Fireflies, making our facilities amongst the best in the country</p>
    <!-- /wp:paragraph -->

    And here is the same page implemented without Blocks CSS. It displays fine in the block editor, with all blocks separate.

    <!-- wp:heading {"level":3} -->
    <h3>Are You Competitive</h3>
    <!-- /wp:heading -->
    
    <!-- wp:paragraph -->
    <p>If you’re starting your studies this October and want to take part in Cambridge team racing in dinghies, this is the CUCrC section you’re looking for! This page should give you a taste of what the Blues sailing teams do and tell you all about Cambridge team racing. The Team Racing Section also provides the University’s Match Racing teams.</p>
    <!-- /wp:paragraph -->
    
    <!-- wp:heading {"level":3} -->
    <h3>UK University Team Racing</h3>
    <!-- /wp:heading -->
    
    <!-- wp:paragraph {"className":"arb-left"} -->
    <p class="arb-left">Most organised university sailing in the UK is team racing. A team race involves two teams of three boats. The winning team is that with the best combined position across the finish line (add up the positions and 10 or less wins the race). Team race courses are small, meaning that each race lasts just 6 to 12 minutes. All of this amounts to an extremely exciting and tactical form of racing. At an event, there will generally be 8 to 24 teams entered, with an initial round robin followed by a knock-out stage.</p>
    <!-- /wp:paragraph -->
    
    <!-- wp:image {"id":1402,"sizeSlug":"large","className":"arb-right"} -->
    <figure class="wp-block-image size-large arb-right"><img src="http://www.cucrc.org/test/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/TRBUSAGybe.jpg" alt="Photo of dinghies sailing" class="wp-image-1402"/><figcaption>Cambridge prepare to gybe at BUSA - with Southampton well trapped outside them</figcaption></figure>
    <!-- /wp:image -->
    
    <!-- wp:paragraph {"className":"arb-left"} -->
    <p class="arb-left">Find out more by viewing the&nbsp;<a rel="noreferrer noopener" href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Team_racing" target="_blank">Wikipedia article on team racing</a>. Also read the excellent book ‘Team Racing Companion’ (ISBN 978-1-909911-11-6) by Chris Atkins – a Blue in all his 3 years and captain of the victorious 1977 varsity team.</p>
    <!-- /wp:paragraph -->
    
    <!-- wp:heading {"level":3} -->
    <h3>Team Racing Boats</h3>
    <!-- /wp:heading -->
    
    <!-- wp:paragraph -->
    <p>Currently, the boat of choice for team racing in the UK is the Firefly. These are 12ft two-man fibreglass dinghies that are highly manoeuvrable. This makes them excellent for tactical team racing moves – obstructing the opposition to let your team mates through. Fireflies are also easily handled and crewed by ladies. CUCrC has two relatively new flights of Fireflies, making our facilities amongst the best in the country</p>
    <!-- /wp:paragraph -->

    And here is the CSS I used in the above code.

    .arb-left {
      max-width: 70% !important;
      float: left !important;
    }
    .arb-right {
      float: right !important;
      max-width: 30% !important;
      margin-top: 0 !important;
      margin-bottom: 0 !important;
      padding-left: 0.5em !important;  
    }
    figure.arb-right > figcaption {
      max-width: 98% !important;
      margin-top: 0 !important;
      margin-bottom: 0 !important;
      padding-top: 0.2em !important;
      padding-bottom: 0.2em !important;
    }

    I have just experienced this problem. I upgraded to WP3.6 and updated several plugins. All was well until I upgraded from NextGEN Gallery 1.9.13 to 2.0.7. The upgrade completed OK, but when I clicked the ‘Return to Plugins page’ link I got a blank screen. I could not get into the site at all – I got a blank page each time.

    I solved the problem by using Filezilla to delete the nextgen-gallery folder from the web server, upload 1.9.13 again (which I had on another site), and re-activate the plugin. Everything worked fine again.

    I did this twice, so there is definitely a problem with 2.0.7. I use a variant of the Misty Look theme, via the ‘child theme’ arrangements.

    Thread Starter Anthony Butler

    (@abutlwer)

    Forgot say that adding:
    define( ‘WP_TEMP_DIR’, ABSPATH . ‘wp-content/’ );
    to your wp-config.php file sorts the problem for plugin upgrades as well.

    Thread Starter Anthony Butler

    (@abutlwer)

    Add the following to your wp-config.php. Remove it after updating to WordPress 3.5.1, says Codex (http://codex.wordpress.org/Version_3.5.1#Windows_Servers_Running_IIS), but I did not bother.

    define( ‘WP_TEMP_DIR’, ABSPATH . ‘wp-content/’ );

    I am hoping that the WP team sorts this error soon.

    Thread Starter Anthony Butler

    (@abutlwer)

    Forgot to say: Solution is to access plugins directory and delete wptuner folder.

    For those that are slow in the uptake – this fix works fine, but you have to re-index after updating it.

    Forum: Fixing WordPress
    In reply to: Auto Draft

    If a plugin or theme does not handle these auto draft pages correctly, you need to do some PHP coding. Here is the filter I have added to the Misty Look theme’s search.php module to get rid of auto draft and trash items that Search Unleashed returns incorrectly:

    <?php $p_status = get_post_status( $post );
           if ($p_status != 'trash' and $p_status != 'auto-draft') : ?>

    Followed later on by:

    <?php else: echo 'One irrelevant ',$p_status,' item not shown here.';
           endif; ?>

    This sort of change is very easily done if you use the ‘child theme’ facilities of WordPress.

    Thread Starter Anthony Butler

    (@abutlwer)

    If a plugin or theme does not handle these auto draft pages correctly, you need to do some PHP coding. Here is the filter I have added to the Misty Look theme’s search.php module to get rid of auto draft and trash items that Search Unleashed returns incorrectly:

    <?php $p_status = get_post_status( $post );
           if ($p_status != 'trash' and $p_status != 'auto-draft') : ?>

    Followed later on by:

    <?php else: echo 'One irrelevant ',$p_status,' item not shown here.';
           endif; ?>

    This sort of change is very easily done if you use the ‘child theme’ facilities of WordPress.

Viewing 15 replies - 1 through 15 (of 29 total)