Support » Requests and Feedback » Is it me or is the plugin universe becoming expensive?

  • Resolved cedaly1968

    (@cedaly1968)


    So as I look around at the plugins I have to run my site I marvel that WordPress costs the user nothing and that the 25 plugins I have would cost about $3000-$4000 a year if they got what they wanted. Perspective, a Pardot license that can market directly to 1MM customers does not cost $4000 a year. The plugins are tricky now – great features, none are free, we just let you install it for free. It might not even work on the free version. But the Paid Pro Premium Big Bang plugin will make you a billionaire.

    hmmmm… would you pay $600/year for a calendar? 12 plugins that cost $89 each? Per year. $1068 a year for a fully featured calendar. I guess if your business is generating a ton of money from a calendar that makes sense. But that’s one plugin and you still have to pay for the other 24. When it costs $24k to run a small web-site I think people will implode!

    Just an observation looking at the plug-in market. BTW, not sure if WordPress has standards to prevent plugins from stepping on each other, but the common correction when one does not work is to unplug all of the other ones to see which one messes up the new one. It takes alot of time to unplug 25 plugins…. and a lot of time to plug them back in. Maybe the code problem is someone else’s?????

    This place is funny – and fun. I love the spirit, but doubt I will ever pay $1000 for a calendar!

Viewing 4 replies - 1 through 4 (of 4 total)
  • Moderator Samuel Wood (Otto)

    (@otto42)

    WordPress.org Admin

    All plugins listed here on WordPress.org are free. Period. Some of them may have upsell features, but you cannot buy plugins from this site.

    They are in fact free to install. But there are many plugins you can install and they make a nice chart for you but if you want them to work, you have to go “pro” or “premium” or whatever. The most popular calendar option for WordPress is $89/year for base premium, but $89/plugin to get all of the functionality. Throw in 12 plugins at $89 and that’s a lot of money per year for one component of a web-site. I have noticed the plugins that are surviving are surging in prices over the last three years, some are completely worth it – depends on the type of site you are building. It’s interesting to watch this growth, but as I priced out a site to a potential client earlier this year, it was double what I had priced out just one year ago. WordPress is “free” but everything you need to accurately support it is not and prices are rising. That’s probably not a bad thing, just an observation.

    Moderator Jan Dembowski

    (@jdembowski)

    Forum Moderator and Brute Squad

    They are in fact free to install.

    All plugins here are free to do anything with the code. That’s an important distinction.

    But there are many plugins you can install and they make a nice chart for you but if you want them to work, you have to go “pro” or “premium” or whatever.

    If any plugin here does not work then please report that plugin. That is not allowed here, the plugin has to work as described in it’s plugin page.

    Note: That’s not the same thing as “The plugin works but for even more features get the pro or premium version”. It is allowed for authors to have a plugin do things that they say and promote additional functionality for a fee. There really is nothing wrong with that and as long as it is all GPL’ed code and they do not violate the plugin guidelines.

    https://developer.wordpress.org/plugins/wordpress-org/detailed-plugin-guidelines/

    Pete

    (@perthmetro)

    Many/some/a few/lots of plugins on here do not work/have any useful function unless you pay money for the extra features/services.

Viewing 4 replies - 1 through 4 (of 4 total)
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