Support » Installing WordPress » How to integrate WordPress with MS SQL Server database

Viewing 13 replies - 1 through 13 (of 13 total)
  • whooami

    (@whooami)

    Member

    you dont.

    http://codex.wordpress.org/Hosting_WordPress

    WordPress requires MySQL. Plain and Simple.

    You want to use MS SQL, find an ASP solution, or rewrite the entire program.

    Start by completely modifying “wp-db.php” to use the MSSQL PHP libraries. Then search recursively through all the files which contain SQL code and change those accordingly.

    Tip: MSSQL doesn’t have a “LIMIT 0,10” type clause, it uses “TOP 10” instead.

    Basically, you have a long job ahead. Personally, I wouldn’t bother as MySQL performs much better anyway. Is there a reason you’re thinking about it?

    It would be a lot easier to install MySQL on the same server as the MS SQL. They can coexist just fine.

    I wouldn’t bother as MySQL performs much better anyway.

    I know this post is over two months old. I couldn’t resist though. Noboby might ever read this but…

    MySQL is an awesome database engine, without a doubt. However, there is no proof that it runs any better that MSSQL.

    I would love to see an MSSQL port of WordPress

    Some of us don’t have much of a choice in the matter. I am supposed to get WordPress set up on a server system that is already tied to MSSQL.

    Just found the reply.
    It just seems that when anybody talks about an MS product, such as MSSQL, the disgust in the voice is evident.

    I would still love to see a port of WordPress to MSSQL, for those of us who are stuck to MSSQL server.

    mrmist

    (@mrmist)

    Forum Janitor

    Interesting idea, but a massive undertaking. Changing the libraries used is only the start. You’d have to check each line of sql code to ensure that it doesn’t use any mysql specific extensions.

    Even the seemingly small matter that pizdin_dim mentioned about MSSQL not using the LIMIT syntax could prove problematice, as LIMIT can be used for paging where SQL Server’s “equivalent” TOP cannot. This could break coding in core files and plugins, so all that would need re-writing.

    In short, you’d have a lot of coding to look forward to.

    Too bad it wasn’t in MSSQL already because then all the T-SQL would be in easy to find stored procedures.

    robbart

    (@robbart)

    I agree that it is probably impossible to update WP to use MS SQL TODAY. Every plugin currently depends on that DB, so they would all have to change as well. This is not a simple matter of modifying some SQL statements in the WP files, but all the plugins, etc as well.

    WP is in this predicament because it wasn’t designed to have the database access abstracted out. If WP were MY product, I would make all DB access go through a plugin, a “data access layer”. You would then theoretically have a plugin for MySQL, MSSql, etc. Why be limited by the backend?

    Anyone making statements comparing MySql to MS SQL should have their facts straight before doing so. While I am certain that MySql is solid, I don’t know that the evidence suggests that on a larger scale, it handles the scalability that SQL Server does. Or even Oracle. Fact is, if I had my druthers, I’d prefer an enterprise level backend for several reasons. But the primary reason, is that in some cases, you don’t have the option of tossing MySql on a production server next to Sql Server. That would never be allowed where I work. As much as I like WP, I would just have to find another solution. It seems that the WP community should be looking to add new instances of this tool, not eliminate them by saying …

    WordPress requires MySQL. Plain and Simple.

    You want to use MS SQL, find an ASP solution, or rewrite the entire program.

    That’s a poor response in my opinion.

    So, while I have agree with the overall sentiment, that it doesn’t support MS SQL, I have to disagree that it’s a losing proposition supporting other DB’s.

    whooami

    (@whooami)

    Member

    If WP were MY product..

    So do it .. it’s open source. Fork the code, make it yours.

    WordPress requires MySQL. Plain and Simple.

    Thats not a “poor response”, that’s a fact (at the time I responded SEVEN months ago) .

    Furthermore, had you you searched instead of posting opines, you would have found that someone has either finished or atleast started work on making WP work in MSSQL.

    So here we are, I don’t know how many months later, and when I search wordpress using sql, this is at the top.

    Uhmm, but I don’t think anybody has really worked on this yet.

    I can’t think of any logical reason why someone would want to use MS SQL over MySQL (certainly not speed, even if people drop by to say MS SQL is “awesome”).

    If full fledged SQL compliance including procedures, constraints, rules and such is what you’re after, then go with PostgreSQL. In its 8.3 incarnation it pretty much trumps MySQL even on performance.

    But I doubt you’ll need MS or Oracle or whathaveyou for a CMS or a blog. The port is not very difficult to do anyway, it’s just laborious.

    I can’t think of any logical reason why someone would want to use MS SQL over MySQL (certainly not speed, even if people drop by to say MS SQL is “awesome”).

    I can think of many logical reasons, one of them being that some of us work for companies that use enterprise level databases.

    But I doubt you’ll need MS or Oracle or whathaveyou for a CMS or a blog.

    Doubt away, but you are wrong.

    That said, I am currently converting this dinosaur from the soon to be deprecated PHP4 to PHP5 and am adding in a data abstraction layer that works with more than just mySQL. I can understand the need to keep a copy of the code in PHP4, since many hosting companies that offer the software to their clients all use PHP 4 because they are too lazy to upgrade to 5, but writing software, in todays technology age, that only works with 1 type of database is, basically, unforgivable.

    I applaud the development team on making a great working blog, they just need to keep up with the times.

Viewing 13 replies - 1 through 13 (of 13 total)
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