Support » Everything else WordPress » How to Become a Translation Editor

  • marcnyc

    (@marcnyc)


    Hello,
    I’ve submitted a translation for a plugin. I did over a week ago but my translation is still waiting.
    I would like to edit a few things in my translation but I can’t do this until I’m an editor and I don’t understand who has to make me one (WordPress or the plugin developer?).
    I clicked on the “Become and Editor” in the page where I submitted the translation but it takes me to this link (https://make.wordpress.org/polyglots/handbook/rosetta/theme-plugin-directories/) and I don’t see anywhere to apply to be an editor. What am I missing?

Viewing 9 replies - 1 through 9 (of 9 total)
  • Bruno Souza

    (@brunobsouza)

    Hello,
    One of the website administrators needs to change your user role to “editor”.
    Cheers!

    Thread Starter marcnyc

    (@marcnyc)

    Are you talk about WP website or plugin website?
    Is there a way to submit a request or accelerate it?

    Bruno Souza

    (@brunobsouza)

    WP website.
    WP has those roles: Administrator, Editor, Author, Contributor and
    Subscriber.
    Your current user role is probably or “Autor” or “Contributor”.
    Someone with administrator role, needs to (on the WP dashboard) go to
    > Users > All users > choose your user > change your role to “editor”.
    You need to contact your website administrator to request it. Probably the admin is the same person that registered you as a user.

    Thread Starter marcnyc

    (@marcnyc)

    I think there is some confusion, here… I am not talking about any website, I am talking about WordPress.org, the WP community, the website with URL wordpress.org (https://translate.wordpress.org/)

    Thread Starter marcnyc

    (@marcnyc)

    Does anyone know how I can speed up being approved as a moderator? it’s taking weeks and my translation is sitting there, unable to be used:

    https://profiles.wordpress.org/marcnyc/#content-translations

    tim874325

    (@tim874325)

    Learn the writing styles of the languages you translate. In my case, English prefers the passive voice, and French, the active voice. This needs to be reflected in my translations.
    Respect the grammatical structure and idioms of the target language, which may be different from the source language. The end result must not “feel” like a translation, but like an original text.
    Watch out for false friends. Similar words in the source and target languages are not necessarily synonyms.
    Translate ideas, not words.
    Be curious and enjoy researching things. Proper names of people, places, etc. may be different in other languages here, or they may use a different spelling. This is not a matter of translator preference.
    Be a good writer and language decoder. In many cases, the original text (the form, not the content) may need to be improved upon in order to be read easily.
    Don’t change the meaning of the text you are translating. Again, this is not a matter of preference. Don’t overtranslate or undertranslate just because it “sounds” better to you that way. Appeal to your target audience, not your own writer’s ego.

    Thread Starter marcnyc

    (@marcnyc)

    I’m totally with you and have done everything you said.
    Italian is my first language and I translated from english to Italian in the way you have described, which is why I wonder why it is taking so long for the translation to be approved.

    Mark Robson

    (@markscottrobson)

    Hi. Please follow the instructions in this link: https://make.wordpress.org/polyglots/handbook/translating/after-your-contribution/. This should help you to get in contact with the Italian team.

    Thread Starter marcnyc

    (@marcnyc)

    thank you @markscottrobson – will try this

Viewing 9 replies - 1 through 9 (of 9 total)
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