Support » Everything else WordPress » How many plugins are installed on WordPress.org?

  • Resolved lucasbustamante

    (@lucasbustamante)


    Hello!

    I’m elaborating a “WordPress Performance” presentation for WordCamp 2017 in Belo Horizonte, and I’ll be talking about cache.

    I’ve read somewhere in the docs that WordPress.org (or WordPress.com?) has over 200 plugins installed – I don’t remember where though!

    Does anyone know where I can find this info?

    Thanks!

Viewing 7 replies - 1 through 7 (of 7 total)
  • Moderator Andrew Nevins

    (@anevins)

    Front-end developer

    WordPress.com and WordPress.org are completely different so you’ll have to be specific as to which website you mean.

    It’s WordPress.org.

    I got curious. WordCamp Belo Horizonte was neither announced nor confirmed. Much less selection of speakers.

    I got curious. WordCamp Belo Horizonte was neither announced nor confirmed. Much less selection of speakers.

    It’s a work in progress! We already had a meet up and the next one is scheduled to march 18. If you’re from Belo Horizonte, I think you can still join us!

    https://www.meetup.com/pt-BR/WordPressBeloHorizonte/events/238276014/?eventId=238276014

    I’m not a confirmed speaker, I’m preparing my presentation for pre-approval on a meetup.

    Moderator Samuel Wood (Otto)

    (@otto42)

    WordPress.org Admin

    It’s somewhat more complicated than that. A lot of what we create for WordPress.org is completely custom, and most of it is thus in plugin form. A raw “count” of plugins is basically meaningless given the context you are looking for.

    However, it’s roughly 150 plugins, more or less. Not all of them are active everywhere. WordPress.org is basically a large multi-site, multi-network setup, with a lot of custom and legacy code in various places.

    It’s somewhat more complicated than that. A lot of what we create for WordPress.org is completely custom, and most of it is thus in plugin form. A raw “count” of plugins is basically meaningless given the context you are looking for.

    However, it’s roughly 150 plugins, more or less. Not all of them are active everywhere. WordPress.org is basically a large multi-site, multi-network setup, with a lot of custom and legacy code in various places.

    Hey Otto, I’m honored by your reply 🙂

    I’ll just give a quick example of the importance of Cache. WordPress was only my first option for doing so.

    I also performed a test on a clean WordPress 4.7.3 install, showing all PHP activity necessary to show the “Hello World” front page. Here are the results:

    Clean WordPress 4.7.3 without cache:
    http://www.lucasbustamante.com.br/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/xdebug_wp_clean.jpg

    Clean WordPress 4.7.3 with cache:
    http://www.lucasbustamante.com.br/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/xdebug_wp_cache.jpg

    (Images are linked, not embed, because of their size)

    WordPress.org has millions of views per month. Imagine if you had to process all of that on every page load. Thus, Caching: Generate a static HTML file and serve it.

    This is just covering the backend performance, I’ll be talking about frontend performance as well. But I won’t disclose my whole presentation here, I think you’ll have to wait for the Belo Horizonte Wordcamp! Hahaha

    Marking thread as resolved.

    Moderator Samuel Wood (Otto)

    (@otto42)

    WordPress.org Admin

    WordPress.org has millions of views per month. Imagine if you had to process all of that on every page load. Thus, Caching: Generate a static HTML file and serve it.

    Actually, most of the site is not statically cached.

    We do have static pages, yes. The homepage, for example, rarely changes. Same with things like /about and such. Most of those are static and raw PHP files. None of them are static HTML, but many of them don’t load WordPress proper.

    But all the “meat” of the site, the forums, the make sites, the blog, the themes directory… those are WordPress, and they are not in any way static-page-cached. They’re built in real-time.

    For caching, we use a large memcache system and have the wp-cache hooked up to it. That serves our needs quite well. This page you’re looking at here, on the forums? Six queries to the DB. Simple. Everything else comes from memory caching.

Viewing 7 replies - 1 through 7 (of 7 total)
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