Support » Plugin: Gutenberg » Haters gonna hate

  • Sorry to all the devs and ppl involved (cause I know a lot of work went into this) but it’s not that big of a change. It looks like it’s going to be a pretty seamless transition— which is a good thing! And it’s definitely not the gigantic WordPress shattering release that everyone has chalked it up to be. I’m really surprised that there is a huge backlash to this update. TinyMCE is by no means perfect. Heading and text styling always gets messed up so I always have to teach clients how to fix things by switching to the code editor view which is never ideal. Now I can instruct clients how to use blocks for certain content types and not have to worry about them getting too hung up on HTML. And now we also have painless columns!! Guys this is huge! Previously this required frankenstien builders that crowded the text editor with shortcodes or slowed things down with bloated plugins. Checking out the front end output of columns and everything else in the Gutenburg post is a breath of fresh air too. I was scared of unnecessary Divs and nested elements but it looks surprisingly lean. Another thing that I’m very excited about is the reusable content block. Can we talk about how much of a game changer this will be? And did everyone notice the page updates with Ajax!?! So buttery!

    Yes, this editor is not perfect yet, but it’s a step in the right direction.

    A few things I’d love to see:

    • Being able to drag the blocks/columns around in the editor.
    • Quick keys for adding blocks to speed up workflow
    • Something that converts old posts to new block layout

    Nice work to everyone involved!!

Viewing 4 replies - 1 through 4 (of 4 total)
  • designsimply

    (@designsimply)

    Member

    Thank you for your feedback!

    You should already be able to drag blocks around, and there is a discussion you might be interested in about the draggable handles happening at https://github.com/WordPress/gutenberg/issues/7114

    On quick keys, have you tried the slash inserter? Start a new block and type “/” followed a block name as the very first thing. If that’s not sufficient, it would be awesome to post your suggestion at https://github.com/WordPress/gutenberg/issues/new?template=Feature_request.md

    To convert an old post to a new block layout, the content should be placed into a classic block first and if you click the more menu on that block you should see an option to “Convert to Blocks.”

    Please let me know if this doesn’t cover everything or if I’ve mis-read any of the points!

    I was scared of unnecessary Divs and nested elements but it looks surprisingly lean.

    This one thing that I was hopping would happen with blocks but so far has not been expanded to cater for complex layouts: sections/rows/columns, grid and flex. In fact, while not wanting to be a page builder, Gutenberg should be, albeit a basic one, acting as a foundational intro for new users/learners of “page building and also one with a good API that the page builder vendors can use to add there one features and interfaces. This would create a cleaner and more uniform environment for theme/builder switching and remove a lot of the unnecessary cruft.

    designsimply

    (@designsimply)

    Member

    Aha, yes. Join us in https://github.com/WordPress/gutenberg/issues if you’re keen to get into the details on those things.

    While it is always interesting to spend time debating these issues, and I have done a fair amount of it here already, I really can’t be spending too much time doing the job that the Gutenberg team should be doing themselves. And, many of us seem to be pushing against a door that won’t open wen it comes to suggestions.

    Even a simple suggestion on how we do or don’t switch between Gutenberg and the current editor. As you know the current editor remains in WordPress 5 with Gutenberg as the default REACT override. Why we need to use a plugin to deactivate it when you can just add a toggle in the Reading settings would make one wonder. There even is a filter that you can add to a theme’s or child theme’s functions.php file to globally turn off Gutenberg.

    Ideally it would be better if Gutenberg only activated as default on new installs, therefore leaving many sites unaffected by bugs and incompatibilities.

    When I see Marius’s suggestion, about a week ago on another review:

    We won’t be adding an option into core it self, that would go against our philosophy of decisions, not options.

    …I lose a bit more faith in people being openminded and fair in the camp that is responsible for the future of WordPress.

    So while I will continue to give feedback on Gutenberg, time permitting, I won’t be spending time in a GitHub repository. My stance, like many others, is final.

Viewing 4 replies - 1 through 4 (of 4 total)
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