Support » Requests and Feedback » FWIW: Webhosting company standard warning against WordPress

  • Resolved websta

    (@websta)


    We are having performance issues on our shared web hosting provider. They sent this cut & pasted response:

    If running a WordPress website, running into resource limits is one risk associated with that platform. That is because the core features of that platform, such as plugins and themes, were not developed by yourself nor the hosting providers. Likewise, the marketplace for plugins and themes does not have a process of quality control that those components must pass before they are released on the marketplace.

    Primarily it would be the plugins being used that are likely responsible for performance issues. Unfortunately, more frequently than not WordPress conceals its inner workings very effectively; making diagnosis of the plugin responsible very difficult and beyond the scope of a hosting provider. Otherwise, our main recommendation is to simply use no more than ten plugins per WordPress site. Beyond that, you would need to seek the assistance of a WordPress development service provider to pinpoint the problem if it is a plugin. Or contact the plugins developers directly. You could also try disabling plugins one-at-a-time and observe if it makes any difference over time.

    I suggest that WordPress embrace a self-hosting software package, such as Uniform Server, and simplify/polish the software further (e.g., automated dynamic dns setups). Even with a slower desktop and a 100Mbps Internet connection, users would have no problem serving up websites. And it’d be free while performing better than most shared webhosts, who have failed to invest in upgrading their infrastructure over the years.

Viewing 4 replies - 1 through 4 (of 4 total)
  • Moderator Steve Stern

    (@sterndata)

    My two cents:

    I have a few sites that are plugin-heavy and burn resources on a standard shared host. I’ve moved them over to Dreampress. It’s not cheap, but it’s resilient and automatically scalable, with built-in caching.

    There’s noting particularly amazing about Uniform Server — it’s just a LAMP stack for Windows. Serious hosting should be on Linux and probably using Nginx rather than Apache. Note: I do run my own sites on Linux using Apache with php-fpm as a fastCGI process.

    Production websites should not be run on local PCs.

    Moderator Samuel Wood (Otto)

    (@otto42)

    WordPress.org Admin

    Even with a slower desktop and a 100Mbps Internet connection, users would have no problem serving up websites.

    FYI, most connections that are meant for more residential means prohibit running servers like that.

    There is indeed a bit more to hosting a website than having a computer on the internet with some software on it. If your hosting service doesn’t satisfy your needs, then I recommend finding a new one. There’s plenty of them around.

    Moderator Jan Dembowski

    (@jdembowski)

    Brute Squad and Volunteer Moderator

    If running a WordPress website, running into resource limits is one risk associated with that platform. That is because the core features of that platform, such as plugins and themes, were not developed by yourself nor the hosting providers.

    Which really code from your provider for “You should look for a new host”.

    The requirements for running WordPress is not exorbitant. That does not mean host providers will not forbid some plugins (some have been truly performance killers) but for the most part, any host should be able to support WordPress without breaking a sweat.

    As noted above, setting up a website on your desktop system violates the terms of service of many ISPs. I also doubt whether ISPs will have much sympathy for someone that gets hit with a 100Gbps DDoS due to running a website, and is responsible for thousands of dollars in bandwidth overages due to the DDoS.

    (For whwt it’s worth…when comparing apples-to-apples, Apache is better than nginx on sites with significant dynamic content. nginx is better than Apache on sites with significant static content, though use of CloudFlare mitigates much of that difference.)

    I agree that WordPress has pretty much outgrown the ability to run on shared hosting. A good part of that is due to the REST API, which seemingly is being used in place of writing actual code. I recently ran across a plugin that made 11 calls to the REST API on a front-end page. THat means the page is loading 12 copies of WordPress! And since the WordPress DBAL doesn’t free result sets after queries (it waits until the next query to do so), DB connections don’t always close immediately when mysqli_close() is called. That means the above page can have up to 12 open DB connections! Needless to say, those who install this plugin on shared hosting will see long page load times, blank pages due to CPU/memory issues, and occasional “Error establishing a database connection” pages.

Viewing 4 replies - 1 through 4 (of 4 total)
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