Support » Networking WordPress » Creating a multilingual Blog Platform: facing a crucial decision, need help

  • Hi!

    I’m working on a blog platform that will start in french but I’m willing to make it avalaible in other languages in the future.

    I’ve been searching for better solutions but it looks the less headache solution would be to run a different WP installation for each language (with same themes and plugins). Am I right?

    If yes, then I would like to have a different subdomain for each language (fr.example.com ; en.example.com ; de.example.com ; …), each running its own Worpdress installation. However I want my users to have their blogs on the main domain (blog1.example.com, blog2.example.com, …) regardless of their language.

    Is that possible? Is that the way to go? Would you have any recommendations on how (and where) to set up and configure my first french WP instance in order to prevent future problems?

    Thank you very much for your help and sorry for my poor english.

    Laurent

Viewing 15 replies - 1 through 15 (of 21 total)
  • To clarify:

    Allowing my customers create their own multilingual blog is something I might consider in the future, but this is not the question here.

    What I want is to make my blog creation service (for example blogcreation.com) available in different languages. Each language would have its own portal and subdomain :

    – fr.blogcreation.com (for french-speaking users)
    – en.blogcreation.com (for english-speaking users)
    – es.blogcreation.com (…)
    – it.blogcreation.com (…)
    – etc.

    Now, the question is:

    Do I create…

    a) different WordPress installs for each language, each with a separate database (wpdb_fr, wpdb_en, wpdb_es, …) and files
    b) one WordPress install only
    c) better alternative?

    >> Solution a) means more work for maintenance/upgrades but no problem with multilingual issues… BUT would it be possible to get all blogs created as subdomains of the main domain: blog1.blogcreation.com, blog2.blogcreation.com, … and not blog1.fr.blogcreation.com, blog2.it.blogcreation.com, …)

    >> Solution b) looks more convenient… BUT what’s about plugins like:
    http://premium.wpmudev.org/project/terms-of-service (I would like them in french on fr, in english on en, …)
    http://premium.wpmudev.org/project/first-comment (I would like it in french on fr, in english on en, …)
    http://premium.wpmudev.org/project/easy-blogging-tooltips (I would like them in french on fr, in english on en, …)
    http://premium.wpmudev.org/project/automatic-follow-up-emails-for-new-users (idem)
    http://premium.wpmudev.org/project/custom-content-dashboard-widget (idem)
    http://premium.wpmudev.org/project/global-footer-content (idem)
    – etc.

    I’m aware this is a fundamental decision but I have to say that I’m very confused on what choice to make…

    Andrea Rennick

    (@andrea_r)

    Customer Care at Copyblogger Media and Studiopress

    It’s not a hard one. 😉 Look at what wordpress.com has, because you are setting up the exact same thing.

    All you need to add are localization files. Then make a language blog for each language. Users will get their blog off the main domain.

    this is out of the box, nothing extra needed but the language file (which are freely available all over the place).

    As for the paid plugin, you’ll have to ask over there if they support multiple languages.

    Hi Andrea,

    Thank you very much for your answer. WordPress.com is a good example as my project looks quite similar.

    All you need to add are localization files. Then make a language blog for each language. Users will get their blog off the main domain.

    Ok, this would be solution b). But actually I’m just wondering if it would not be easier to simply set separate WordPress installs (one for each language (solution a)) to prevent a lot of headaches in the future.

    I’m asking that because upgrades are now very easy and quick in WP (it wouldn’t take so long to repeat the processes on 4-5 different installs). In the the contrary, it looks like multilingual support is not that easy with WP and can bring a lot of problems (for example with plugins).

    So what are the top reasons I should opt for a single install?

    Moderator Ipstenu (Mika Epstein)

    (@ipstenu)

    🏳️‍🌈 Halfelf Rogue & Plugin Review Team Rep

    Single Install with Multisite means:
    1) You have ONE admin ID to log in with
    2) You have ONE site to upgrade plugins, themes and WP core
    3) Uses less space
    4) Uses less DATABASE space
    5) Why duplicate effort?

    Andrea Rennick

    (@andrea_r)

    Customer Care at Copyblogger Media and Studiopress

    And why make separate install when you can just.. .click a button in the network and add a new site?

    You can add a dozen different language files and have each blog pick what they like.

    This *is* how wordpress.com does it.

    Ok, you convinced me 🙂

    But I have another problem with this configuration.

    My main blog (example.com) will be redirecting users to the different languages portals (like http://www.wikipedia.org does for the different wikipedias for example):

    The different portals would be:

    • en.example.com (set in english)
    • fr.example.com (set in french)
    • it.example.com (set in italian)
    • etc.

    The problem:

    If a visitor of it.example.com click on “Registrati” (http://it.example.com/wp-login.php?action=register) he is automatically being redirected to http://example.com/wp-signup.php which is the main blog (but in a different language!).

    This looks like a big issue to me. Is that normal?

    Sorry if this is a stupid question. I’m just learning…

    Moderator Ipstenu (Mika Epstein)

    (@ipstenu)

    🏳️‍🌈 Halfelf Rogue & Plugin Review Team Rep

    That is expected, actually, and normal, though it’s also a big issue, you’re right.

    Basically you sign up on the main site (example.com) and that signup form uses the language on the main site.

    Ok, but this is not acceptable for a multilingual service. How did WordPress.com solve this problem? Is there a plugin to correct this? A visitor signing-up on a french sub blog should be directed to a french sign-up form and get a french dashboard, shouldn’t he?

    Andrea Rennick

    (@andrea_r)

    Customer Care at Copyblogger Media and Studiopress

    How did WordPress.com solve this problem?

    Not that I know for sure, but I’d do a browser detection for language and show them the right signup page.

    The problem is that user might be using a browser set in a language he doesn’t understand (and this is quite common).

    I’ve asked the same question here: http://premium.wpmudev.org/forums/topic/multilingual-sign-up-page

    The solution provided by wpmudev looks similar to the one you (Andrea) gave 4 months ago: http://wordpress.org/support/topic/2-sign-up-page-for-wp3?replies=5

    I think this is the way to go.

    I’m new to WP and I’m just wondering if I could encouter the same problem with other pages or if this is specific to the sign-up page only. Maybe you have an idea?

    Moderator Ipstenu (Mika Epstein)

    (@ipstenu)

    🏳️‍🌈 Halfelf Rogue & Plugin Review Team Rep

    I don’t think so, but there’s always the possibility :/

    Well, actually the right question is:

    Are there any other pages redirecting to the main blog?

    I’ve checked the following ones:

    The only pahe with this problem seems to be http://fr.example.com/wp-login.php?action=register

    Moderator Ipstenu (Mika Epstein)

    (@ipstenu)

    🏳️‍🌈 Halfelf Rogue & Plugin Review Team Rep

    Are there any other pages redirecting to the main blog?

    Heh, I actually guessed that’s what you mean 😉 The register page SHOULD be the only one, since by default it punts you back to example.com.

    Andrea Rennick

    (@andrea_r)

    Customer Care at Copyblogger Media and Studiopress

    Are there any other pages redirecting to the main blog?

    no, just the signup page.

    Mhh… this sounds like a good news! 🙂

    Thank you very much for your assistance and good advices, Ipstenu and Andrea! I will try to set up this page template. There are some good explanations here: http://codex.wordpress.org/Pages#Creating_Your_Own_Page_Templates

Viewing 15 replies - 1 through 15 (of 21 total)
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