Support » Requests and Feedback » Crazy stupid setting that makes WordPress Insecure

  • Cliff

    (@heathcliffe2000)


    Hi, when a user registers on a site they are sent an email with a link asking them to set a password.
    If the user chooses NOT to accept the suggested password, and they start typing they are presented with a checkbox to enable them to enter a password of their choosing.

    e.g. A user could literally have a username 123 and a password abc

    This seems totally crazy and stupid and I can’t believe this is even an option.

    Trying to find how to disable this is incredibly hard. Only one plugin was suggested, which did not work in my case.
    I found some code which I put in my child theme but this messed up all my email notifications as they were sent from wordpress@ instead of admin@ (yes, I have all the right settings to change the email header and using smtp instead of php etc).
    My hosting company had to get involved and insert code into my child theme.
    Although i now get email notifications from the correct email address, if I enable the BNFW plugin (because the standard email from WP looks crap) I don’t get them all.

    I keep getting great new features in WP releases, but nobody seems to be addressing the simplest of things like security and emailing. Why make it so darn difficult and ugly. Why is WP still using PHP and why are we having to install plugins and mess about with code just to get “normal” things to work.

    My situation of course, is around a WooCommerce site where users place an order and sign up as part of the order process.

    Thanks for reading

Viewing 1 replies (of 1 total)
  • Moderator Jan Dembowski

    (@jdembowski)

    Brute Squad and Volunteer Moderator

    Try and lay off the derogatory language here. No one here is your punching bag, there’s a difference between “frankly speaking” and being insulting.

    I found some code which I put in my child theme but this messed up all my email notifications as they were sent from wordpress@ instead of admin@ (yes, I have all the right settings to change the email header and using smtp instead of php etc).

    You can change the default sender using a filter or plugin.

    http://www.wpbeginner.com/plugins/how-to-change-sender-name-in-outgoing-wordpress-email/

    The wordpress@host is a default that works for many. For sites that I want to change it I make it something via the filter and a mu-plugin for no-reply@domain.com. The filter works when I did that years ago.

    Hi, when a user registers on a site they are sent an email with a link asking them to set a password.

    OK. So far so good.

    If the user chooses NOT to accept the suggested password, and they start typing they are presented with a checkbox to enable them to enter a password of their choosing.

    Right. That is the default setting as some people react badly to being told to use PJHGVFcxWyffnEpDVV8E or something like that. They should use something exactly like that but many users still don’t do that or use password managers.

    This seems totally crazy and stupid and I can’t believe this is even an option.

    Putting aside the insulting phrasing, how exactly is that stupid? That’s permitting users an option is the preferred way to do it.

    WordPress installations can and does encourage users to be responsible but forcing that on people has literally gotten comments about WordPress becoming “Fascist, Dictatorial and an Authoritative™” platform.

    Can you imagine the volume of support topics because they were forced to use passwords that they cannot recall? You have to educate users first before tossing them into the fire. More knowledgable users will have an encrypted cloud bases password manager but many more users have no idea what that is.

    I keep getting great new features in WP releases, but nobody seems to be addressing the simplest of things like security and emailing.

    Untrue. The default suggesting of a password is one step towards that. The emailing to confirm that a user has changed their password is another.

    It didn’t take me anytime to find a plugin to force strong passwords.

    https://wordpress.org/plugins/search/force+strong+passwords/

    If you are really concerned then you can also include 2FA.

    https://wordpress.org/plugins/search/two+factor/

    If you want to enforce strong passwords on your site then use that plugin option. But try and understand that punishing users with a security policy as a WordPress default would be a mistake.

    Educate the users to the risks. Encourage strong passwords. That is what WordPress does today. If your site has different requirements then adjust them on your site.

Viewing 1 replies (of 1 total)
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