Viewing 10 replies - 1 through 10 (of 10 total)
  • Plugin Author davdebcom

    (@davdebcom)

    Hi John

    The label is correct, the main reason to use a beta label, is the hope that people will pay a bit more attention to the changelog and see that PHP 5.6 is now required.

    Kind regards
    David

    Same question came to mind here. Upgrading from 3.x.x to 4.x.x should be enough of a warning, but sure. Thanks David.

    Plugin Author davdebcom

    (@davdebcom)

    Well, I would hope so, but not everybody knows about semver.

    eaglejohn

    (@danielbenjamins)

    In my case “beta” means don’t update, for live client websites

    @eaglejohn

    Not only in your case ;-).
    This makes things very unclear for me. Should I upgrade yes or no? According to our securitypolicy we need to stay on the latest version, but beta means to me not ready for production/ can have some serious bugs…

    Plugin Author davdebcom

    (@davdebcom)

    It’s simple: you don’t feel confident about it, don’t update and wait for the stable.

    If there was a security update, it would be mentioned in the changelog off course. And if a security issue was known before releasing the beta’s, I would have added the fix in the previous stable version as a point release.

    @davdebcom Thanks for your quick reply. We will wait for the stable 🙂

    • This reply was modified 1 year, 1 month ago by  digitalmouse.
    Jos Klever

    (@josklever)

    @davdebcom Why have you marked this beta version already as stable in trunk/readme.txt?

    For more than a month I have 35 sites with available updates that I can’t install. Clients are asking questions, are thinking I’m not doing my job or are clicking update themselves.

    I don’t think you are following the plugin developer guidelines and it wouldn’t be good for anyone if the plugin was removed for this.

    • This reply was modified 1 year ago by  Jos Klever.
    Plugin Author davdebcom

    (@davdebcom)

    Hi Jos,

    Is it against the guidelines? I never found a specific rule against it, feel free to point me to the correct article. Wouldn’t want to not follow the guidelines.

    I actually only found an indirect sentence that seems to communicate that versions other then stable are allowed.
    https://developer.wordpress.org/plugins/wordpress-org/detailed-plugin-guidelines/#14-frequent-commits-to-a-plugin-should-be-avoided

    The two remaining issues are: some servers don’t have valid cacert.pem files, some sites have conflicts with other plugins that use Guzzle/Composer. Both issues will be fixed. I hope to release the stable this week.

    I hope you understand that I choose to be extra careful when releasing a new major version to 40.000 eCommerce websites.

    Kind regards
    David

    Jos Klever

    (@josklever)

    I didn’t receive a notification, so I’m too late now with my reply, but the first line of that rule says “The SVN repository is a release repository, not a development one.”

    You can always commit beta versions, as long as you don’t mark them as “Stable” which you did with your beta versions.

    It’s the first time in years that I experienced this method, so maybe it’s not really clear in the rules, but common sense says you don’t mark beta versions as stable. Maybe you can contact the Plugins Team yourself to ask for more information and to keep out of trouble 😉

    I’m gonna update 35 sites to 4.0.1 now.

Viewing 10 replies - 1 through 10 (of 10 total)
  • The topic ‘Beta?’ is closed to new replies.