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After upgrade to 2.7 – very slow

  • Hi

    Made the upgrade from 2.6.5 to 2.7. It seemed that everything went well – plugins are working correctly.

    But: WordPress is running very slowly now – before the upgrade a page had about 1 second to load – now it takes more than 5 seconds.

    I dispabled several plugins – no change.

    The admin pages are very slowly as well.

    Any help?

    My blog in German

Viewing 15 replies - 61 through 75 (of 147 total)
  • i tried this and it helps me, my upgraded install from 2.6.x to 2.7 is now fast as the old installation. here are my modifikations.

    Try disabling all external HTTP access:

    1. /wp-includes/http.php
    2. this on about line 210:

    function request( $url, $args = array() ) {
    global $wp_version;

    3. Change it to:

    function request( $url, $args = array() ) {
    return;
    global $wp_version;

    4. Save the file and upload to your host, Open the admin again and see how things fair, Report back on if its helped or not.

    http://www.gpunkt.at

    As suggested by DD32 in the discussion of ticket #8590, services that rely on external HTTP, such as pinging, are killed by this band aid solution. Meanwhile #8590 has been open a month and still has not been assigned to anyone.

    Not to be redundant, but I’m having a similar problem. Upgraded to 2.7 and after a few days, everything has gradually slowed down to the point where I have to refresh the page a few times in order to even get it loading (which in itself – takes a while).

    I’ve tried disabling plugins and following the steps provided by @moses68 but no luck.

    I’ve researched this extensively and many people are having the same issue. Here’s my server info if it helps at all:

    Apache version 2.0.63
    PHP version 5.2.6
    MySQL version 4.1.22-standard
    Architecture i686
    Operating system Linux
    Kernel version 2.6.9-023stab044.11-enterprise

    Thanks,

    http://www.zoomrix.com

    I installed 2.7 a week ago. This was my first WordPress-installation, and I had high hopes. (BTW, I had to ask my web host to boost the php memory from 16 to 24 MB in order to get it installed.) Admin is indeed very slow: Sometimes it can take as “short” as 5-6 seconds to load a page, while sometimes it never loads at all.

    But my homepage (i.e. the public pages) is also extremely slow. This is my main concern. It seems the “slowness” problem discussed here applies to the Admin pages, but I was wondering how many of you have problems with the public end as well?

    Even though there is no immediate fix, it sometimes helps to know that I’m not alone 🙂 I can only hope that people who know more about this kind of stuff than I, are able to pinpoint the problem and offer a solution.

    @yallaman – I’m having the same problem.

    Alright, I talked with my provided and they upgraded my stuff to the following:

    cPanel Version 11.24.4-CURRENT
    cPanel Build 33098
    Apache version 2.0.63
    PHP version 5.2.8
    MySQL version 4.1.22-standard
    Architecture i686
    Operating system Linux
    Kernel version 2.6.9-023stab044.11-enterprise
    cPanel Pro 1.0 (RC1)

    And still no luck, pages are barely loading (admin and public).

    Thanks,

    http://www.zoomrix.com

    Disabling http-access, like described by moses68, helped me. WP seems to run as expected. Thank you.

    http://wordpress.org/support/topic/224410/page/3?replies=67#post-947263

    Alright, I tried the http.php hack again and after a little while the performance seemed to have increased to normal.

    However, is anyone aware of the consequences from disabling all external HTTP access?

    > However, is anyone aware of the consequences from disabling all external HTTP access?

    “As suggested by DD32 in the discussion of ticket #8590, services that rely on external HTTP, such as pinging, are killed by this band aid solution. Meanwhile #8590 has been open a month and still has not been assigned to anyone. “

    For example, the sitexml plugin can no longer ping google, etc. when your posts have changed with the band aid solution.

    Hi,

    I had a similar problem with the Upgrade to 2.7 or a Fresh Install on 2.7 appearing to run “slow” – pages would not load at all it seemed.

    Remembered a similar problem with my hosting provider from many moons ago and realised it might be a similar thing.

    My hosting provider’s (Supanames) firewall prevents PHP using fopen wrappers to http connections outside the firewall unless you specifically request domains that your site is allowed to connect to. Not sure if this is a problem with anyone else, but as soon as I hacked http.php it works fine.

    My guess is something changed in the 2.7 code to use a different method of calling external URL’s – when this is done on my hosting, it just hangs and never times out or anything.

    Anyway, hope this helps some people even though it’s a long way down the list.

    And just to add my 2c – as WordPress is used on a huge number of servers, the server setup’s may be a problem, but WordPress maybe needs to take this into account a bit more so list mod’s stop throwing their toys out of the pram every time someone takes a poke at WordPress because they are frustrated that their apparently easy to upgrade / install piece of software does not work. Just because its OS does not mean it’s not subject to quality standards. The base quality standard being “does it work for me”?

    Later.

    Ski

    @minger
    I am surprised, too that my bugreport seems not to be accepted as bug. But you could read in the first comments of the report – I was told that “slownessis not a bug” – and the bug report was closed very fast. I reopened it and DD32 gave some hints and the hack. I am quite disappointed as well.

    Further investigation into this problem has shown up fopen with URL wrappers to be causing the problem.

    This only seems to occur with PHP 4 on my hosting package – if I switch to PHP 5 it all seems to work. With PHP 4 – the only transport I have available is fopen, which means that the system will bomb if I allow it to use this…

    I can now use http.php, after commenting out the option for checking WP_Http_Fopen::test() in the file – around line 103 in the _getTransport function – I could hack the test a bit rather than this function, but you get the picture: If a transport is messing you around – comment it out, or comment them all out then uncomment 1 by 1 until you find the culprit.

    Now I can still use http methods and don’t have to “return” at the top of the request function. (PHP 5)

    The WP_Http_Fopen::test() only tests for allow_url_fopen – which is valid, but on my hosting, there is no way of testing if a URL is blocked by the firewall. Not sure about the slowness of Curl, but this works fine. One thing I have noticed after adding debug into the request code is that the dashboard page makes 4 requests to the same URL so if 1 call is slow, then the others maybe slow too. I know that the dashboard is a modular thing, but hey couldn’t WP cache the results of these requests or something so that the returned data could be reused…

    1. I would recommend allowing users to select which transports to use in order to override the system – it’s alright checking, but because of the issues with external library versions, etc. It might be nice to allow people to tweak the settings to suit them.

    2. If you are not caching the URL requests offsite, please do, or make it a lot easier to turn them off…

    Thanks

    skila

    Samuel Wood (Otto)
    WordPress.org Tech Dude

    @otto42

    I would recommend allowing users to select which transports to use in order to override the system – it’s alright checking, but because of the issues with external library versions, etc. It might be nice to allow people to tweak the settings to suit them.

    There is a way to do this, it’s just not easy/obvious.

    Examine this code:

    function block_transport() { return false; }
    add_filter('use_http_extension_transport', 'block_transport');
    add_filter('use_curl_transport', 'block_transport');
    add_filter('use_streams_transport', 'block_transport');
    add_filter('use_fopen_transport', 'block_transport');
    add_filter('use_fsockopen_transport', 'block_transport');

    That blocks all the http transports. If you know which transport you wish to use, to the exclusion of the others, then you can simply remove that line and voila, it’s not blocked and will be used (if it is detected as available in the first place, of course). Just add this code to your theme’s functions.php file, or to a plugin or something.

    hey couldn’t WP cache the results of these requests or something so that the returned data could be reused…

    The various RSS feeds read by the dashboard are indeed cached, in the database, for up to 1 hour.

    Cool – thanks for the tip on the blocking…

    “The various RSS feeds read by the dashboard are indeed cached, in the database, for up to 1 hour.”

    I am not sure if that is true for my system: when I put in debug in the WP_Http request function to see what is happening where I see the same URL being requested 4 times in the dashboard, surely if the results are cached in the database, then these request would not occur. Is caching turned on by default or not?

    Thanks

    skila

    Samuel Wood (Otto)
    WordPress.org Tech Dude

    @otto42

    The http stuff doesn’t do any caching at all. If you tell it to make an http request, then it makes an http request. The feed caching is higher level than that, it happens in the rss reader.

    Sometimes you want it to cache, sometimes you don’t. Caching is therefore outside the scope of the http api.

    Also note that if it didn’t get anything for the feed, then it won’t be caching the feed and so will try to get it again.

    @tin68
    Thanks for reopening the ticket. Seems like Viper007bond wanted more specificity, which is fair. The problem is seen, in my testing and @skila reports, with fresh installs too, so I changed the component on the ticket from “upgrade” to “http.” Hopefully that will garner the ticket more respect.

    @skila
    I am seeing the problem with php5; I’m not using php4.

    $ apache2 -M
    reports
    php5_module (shared)

Viewing 15 replies - 61 through 75 (of 147 total)
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