Support » Requests and Feedback » Admin screen headings

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  • From that example, neither are wrong. They are differnt methods of showing different forms of data.

    In your first example with the ‘Menus’ section. the headline of ‘Menus’ is the overall page title, and covers everything on that page, so it goes above the tabs as the tabs control data that’s under that main heading.

    In your second example from WooCommerce settings, the headline for ‘Store Address’ is relevant ony to the tab that you’re on, so it goes under the tab. If there was a main heading of ‘Settings’ it would go above the tabs, but in this case that just takes up screen real estate and doesn’t do much for the overall page itself.

    So going by your analogy, the main heading of “Menus” also just takes up screen real estate and doesn’t do much for the overall page itself.

    The store address isn’t a headline, it’s a section heading for the content under the general tab.

    • This reply was modified 2 months, 2 weeks ago by  Ivan Lutrov.
    • This reply was modified 2 months, 2 weeks ago by  Ivan Lutrov.

    To a point yes, ‘Menus’ does just take up screen real estate – but in that case it’s needed because that’s what the page is about. With the second example, there’s a lot of different settings, so it makes sense (to me at least) that the overall heading can be ommited.

    There’s no “one right way” to do things like this. It’s what works in each instance. Sometimes it’s one, sometimes it’s the other.

    Of course it’s needed because every page deserves a H1 heading. WordPress prides itself on being a semantic publishing platform, and that’s why WordPress core always includes a H1.

    > There’s no “one right way” to do things like this. It’s what works in each instance. Sometimes it’s one, sometimes it’s the other.

    Like I said, consistency matters in interface design. Unless you don’t care about the user experience. The “what works in each instance” is ridiculous and should never be tolerated.

    If you feel that strongly about it, you should ask about it in the WooCommerce forum, or contact them directly, as the page that you’re referring to is part of the WooCommerce system, and not added in by WordPress itself. They might agree and add it in.

    Moderator Jan Dembowski

    (@jdembowski)

    Forum Moderator and Brute Squad

    I’ll regret this, I am sure.

    The “what works in each instance” is ridiculous and should never be tolerated.

    It’s not ridiculous to let people solve the problem they have the way they want to. Attempting to enforce some sort of arbitrary “standard” like that isn’t now opensource or this place works.

    Consistency in interfaces is meaningless in the face of what the designer or coder is trying to accomplish. Don’t attempt to force people to do anything like that. If it really bothers you then suggest a patch to that plugin.

    I too am already regretting posting the issue in the first place. Instead of thoughtful replies, all I got was people being defensive and falling back on the whole “it’s open source, let people do whatever they want” thing.

    > Attempting to enforce some sort of arbitrary “standard” like that isn’t now opensource or this place works.

    That may be your view, and it’s pretty sad that more WordPress developers don’t understand (or seem to be interested in) usability.

    • This reply was modified 2 months, 2 weeks ago by  Ivan Lutrov.
    Moderator Andrew Nevins

    (@anevins)

    WCLDN 2018 Contributor | Volunteer support

    Let’s not make this personal.

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