Support » Plugin: Translate WordPress - Google Language Translator » Adding a CSS class to the widgets

  • Resolved Aert Hulsebos

    (@aahulsebos)


    Hi,

    We’re working on an integration with your plugin, it would be most helpful to be able to add a class to your stylesheet so we can manipulate the widget so we can set a placeholder before consent.

    I got it to work, just wanted to know if you’re able to add this option at your end so it doesn’t take a great deal of documentation/customization to explain it to the end-user, as well as relying to much on the integration that needs maintenance.

    If you’re able, please consider wpconsentapi.org, an API by Cookiebot and Complianz to standardize consent.

    Let me know! regards Aert | Complianz

Viewing 5 replies - 1 through 5 (of 5 total)
  • Plugin Author edo888

    (@edo888)

    Hi,

    Can you provide more details about what are you doing?

    “set a placeholder before consent” – may be you can provide an example?

    Thanks! 🙂

    Aert Hulsebos

    (@aahulsebos)

    Hi @edo888,

    I am working on a solution for a user of Complianz, and your plugin:

    https://wordpress.org/support/topic/google-translate-9/

    In short, the googleapis.com domain should be blocked before consent, because it registers an IP address without any explanation about sharing, or processing.

    In that case, live translation without consent is not possible anymore in the EU. For this purpose, we always try to set a placeholder that provides feedback about the blocked service and the need of consent.

    We use div classes to set placeholders. In this case, all div elements are with ID only, which overrules any changes we like to make without a significant hack.

    The best solution would be to work with the Consent API. This API is created by Complianz & Cookiebot to standardize consent between plugins & services.

    https://github.com/rlankhorst/wp-consent-level-api

    It works like this:

    Complianz or Cookiebot will register consent and push it to the API to standardize consent for all plugins. Based upon the integration of the plugin(s), scripts are either blocker or loaded before/after consent. This creates an opportunity for all plugins to conform to privacy laws in the EU, and other countries when applicable.

    Let me know what you think, we can help if you’re interested.

    More about this API: https://wptavern.com/proposal-to-add-a-consent-api-to-wordpress-feature-plugin-available

    Plugin Author edo888

    (@edo888)

    Hi,

    I still do not understand how adding a CSS class will prevent the necessary external js files from being loaded, may be you can provide more details?

    Thanks! 🙂

    Aert Hulsebos

    (@aahulsebos)

    Hi @edo888,

    It’s not about blocking the scripts, but what happens afterward. In most cases blocking scripts will render the service on hold, and sometimes invisible. To show a placeholder we use classes where the content used to be, to add feedback for the user.

    For example: https://demo.complianz.io/placeholders/vimeo/

    We like to do this for the translate widgets as well.

    regards Aert

    Plugin Author edo888

    (@edo888)

    Hi,

    I’m still not sure I understand you. I checked the example and I clearly see the video without providing any consent, Revoke Consent button clearly does not work there.

    I’m not sure how adding a placeholder on top of the language switcher will stop the loading of necessary 3rd party javascript files and solve the issue below you have described earlier:

    In short, the googleapis.com domain should be blocked before consent, because it registers an IP address without any explanation about sharing, or processing.

    So if you want to block googleapis.com or other domains to solve some privacy issue, you need a different approach, adding a class to “easily” show a placeholder is not going to solve it, since scripts are still being loaded.

    From my point of view (which can be wrong) the website owner should simply state what services are being used on the website, what is being shared, etc. (I think it is called DPA: Data Processing Addendum), so the visitor who is concerned about privacy can check it and decide if they want to continue using the website or no. Adding a placeholder clearly does not solve the issue you have described.

    Thanks!

Viewing 5 replies - 1 through 5 (of 5 total)
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