Support » Plugin: WP-Optimize - Clean, Compress, Cache. » A few questions about caching

  • Resolved truebusinessman

    (@truebusinessman)


    Hello!

    Previously, WP-Optimize only optimized the database. Now the plugin is able to cache pages. This is new functionality, it appeared recently, right?

    In this regard, please allow me to ask 3 questions:

    1. Can your plugin compete with other caching plugins like WP Super Cache, WP Fastest Cache, and others? Are you serious about developing page caching functionality?

    2. Can the plugin clear the caching of specific pages/posts when they are updated? Not resetting the whole cache, but resetting the cache of specific pages/posts when updating.

    3. Can a plugin minify the code? Or do I need to use Autoptimize and other similar plugins for this?

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  • Plugin Author David Anderson

    (@davidanderson)

    Hi,

    Thanks for asking!

    1) Certainly! It’s always been our team’s view that something needs to be the best of its kind, if it’s going to be done at all. Why reproduce something less good than elsewhere? We are using WP-O’s page cacheing on all our own sites… and speaking personally, after over a decade of using WordPress, it’s the first page cacheing plugin that I didn’t find it awkward or annoying to configure (we’ve put a lot of work into the usability).

    2. Yes, this is an already-existing feature. It happens automatically.

    3. As of yet there’s no minification feature. For now, complementing the page cache with minification from another plugin (e.g. Fast Velocity Minify, Autoptimize) is recommended.

    David

    Thank you so much for the answers! Let me clarify please the second and third questions.

    2) If WP-Optimize automatically deletes the cache when the page/post is updated.

    Then does the cache lifetime make sense to put 0? That is infinite.

    After all, the pages when updating will have a new cache. It turns out, caching will not become outdated. And users always see the actual version of the pages?

    3) Is WP-Optimize compatible with Fast Velocity Minify, Autoptimize and other similar plugins for minification?

    Have you tested other minification plugins along with your caching?

    Plugin Author David Anderson

    (@davidanderson)

    If WP-Optimize automatically deletes the cache when the page/post is updated.

    Yes, it does.

    Then does the cache lifetime make sense to put 0? That is infinite.

    This depends upon whether you have other things that might alter page content other than you updating a post/page. e.g. Perhaps you have widgets that provide content that changes over time, or upon other particular events.

    3) Is WP-Optimize compatible with Fast Velocity Minify, Autoptimize and other similar plugins for minification?

    Yes (and we use both of those ourselves currently on different sites).

    This depends upon whether you have other things that might alter page content other than you updating a post/page. e.g. Perhaps you have widgets that provide content that changes over time, or upon other particular events.

    most important reason not to have a too long a caching time are nonces (a kind of one time password use to protect forms from being abused). standard WordPress nonces have a 12h lifetime if I’m not mistaking, so if you have a plugin that inserts forms and that uses nonces (it should) then you’d want to limit cache lifetime to avoid the form not being accepted.

    frank (ao dev, I go where autoptimize is mentioned 😉 )

    Plugin Author David Anderson

    (@davidanderson)

    By default, pages are only cached or served from cache when not logged in. A plugin that generates nonces when not logged in is “doing it wrong”, because nonces are for protecting against cross-site request forgeries (CSRF), and they use data unique to the logged-in user to help do so. As such, if you’re not logged in, then nonces make no sense, because the form is already public (see: https://developer.wordpress.org/plugins/security/nonces/); they can’t protect against anything.

    Having said that, though, plugins that do things wrongly exist, so, yes, if you have user-accessible forms you could either set a finite expiry; you could also read the HTML of the forms to see if they have a nonce when you’re not logged in first to see if it’s necessary.

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