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Attributes Edit

Common Sources Common Sources

Attribute sources are used to define the strategy by which block attribute values are extracted from saved post content. They provide a mechanism to map from the saved markup to a JavaScript representation of a block.

If no attribute source is specified, the attribute will be saved to (and read from) the block’s comment delimiter.

Each source accepts an optional selector as the first argument. If a selector is specified, the source behavior will be run against the corresponding element(s) contained within the block. Otherwise it will be run against the block’s root node.

Under the hood, attribute sources are a superset of functionality provided by hpq, a small library used to parse and query HTML markup into an object shape. In an object of attributes sources, you can name the keys as you see fit. The resulting object will assign as a value to each key the result of its attribute source.

attribute attribute

Use attribute to extract the value of an attribute from markup.

Example: Extract the src attribute from an image found in the block’s markup.

{
    url: {
        type: 'string',
        source: 'attribute',
        selector: 'img',
        attribute: 'src',
    }
}
// { "url": "https://lorempixel.com/1200/800/" }

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text text

Use text to extract the inner text from markup.

{
    content: {
        type: 'string',
        source: 'text',
        selector: 'figcaption',
    }
}
// { "content": "The inner text of the figcaption element" }

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html html

Use html to extract the inner HTML from markup.

{
    content: {
        type: 'string',
        source: 'html',
        selector: 'figcaption',
    }
}
// { "content": "The inner text of the <strong>figcaption</strong> element" }

Use the multiline property to extract the inner HTML of matching tag names for the use in RichText with the multiline prop.

{
    content: {
        type: 'string',
        source: 'html',
        multiline: 'p',
        selector: 'blockquote',
    }
}
// { "content": "<p>First line</p><p>Second line</p>" }

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query query

Use query to extract an array of values from markup. Entries of the array are determined by the selector argument, where each matched element within the block will have an entry structured corresponding to the second argument, an object of attribute sources.

Example: Extract src and alt from each image element in the block’s markup.

{
    images: {
        type: 'array',
        source: 'query'
        selector: 'img',
        query: {
            url: {
                type: 'string',
                source: 'attribute',
                attribute: 'src',
            },
            alt: {
                type: 'string',
                source: 'attribute',
                attribute: 'alt',
            },
        }
    }
}
// {
//   "images": [
//     { "url": "https://lorempixel.com/1200/800/", "alt": "large image" },
//     { "url": "https://lorempixel.com/50/50/", "alt": "small image" }
//   ]
// }

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Meta Meta

Attributes may be obtained from a post’s meta rather than from the block’s representation in saved post content. For this, an attribute is required to specify its corresponding meta key under the meta key:

attributes: {
    author: {
        type: 'string',
        source: 'meta',
        meta: 'author'
    },
},

From here, meta attributes can be read and written by a block using the same interface as any attribute:

edit: function( props ) {
    function onChange( event ) {
        props.setAttributes( { author: event.target.value } );
    }

    return el( 'input', {
        value: props.attributes.author,
        onChange: onChange,
    } );
},
edit( { attributes, setAttributes } ) {
    function onChange( event ) {
        setAttributes( { author: event.target.value } );
    }

    return <input value={ attributes.author } onChange={ onChange } type="text" />;
},

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Considerations Considerations

By default, a meta field will be excluded from a post object’s meta. This can be circumvented by explicitly making the field visible:

function gutenberg_my_block_init() {
    register_meta( 'post', 'author', array(
        'show_in_rest' => true,
    ) );
}
add_action( 'init', 'gutenberg_my_block_init' );

Furthermore, be aware that WordPress defaults to:

  • not treating a meta datum as being unique, instead returning an array of values;
  • treating that datum as a string.

If either behavior is not desired, the same register_meta call can be complemented with the single and/or type parameters as follows:

function gutenberg_my_block_init() {
    register_meta( 'post', 'author_count', array(
        'show_in_rest' => true,
        'single' => true,
        'type' => 'integer',
    ) );
}
add_action( 'init', 'gutenberg_my_block_init' );

If you’d like to use an object or an array in an attribute, you can register a string attribute type and use JSON as the intermediary. Serialize the structured data to JSON prior to saving, and then deserialize the JSON string on the server. Keep in mind that you’re responsible for the integrity of the data; make sure to properly sanitize, accommodate missing data, etc.

Lastly, make sure that you respect the data’s type when setting attributes, as the framework does not automatically perform type casting of meta. Incorrect typing in block attributes will result in a post remaining dirty even after saving (cf. isEditedPostDirty, hasEditedAttributes). For instance, if authorCount is an integer, remember that event handlers may pass a different kind of data, thus the value should be cast explicitly:

function onChange( event ) {
    props.setAttributes( { authorCount: Number( event.target.value ) } );
}
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