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WP 3.1 Makes Videos Vanish in Visual Editing (12 posts)

  1. Ayrleig
    Member
    Posted 3 years ago #

    Please correct this.

    When one enters video embed code in HTML editing, then switches to visual, in order to center the video, it vanishes.

    Why do you want the space that videos take unrepresented in the visual editing window? This is very inconvenient -- a big step backward.

    There may be other ways of adding a video (historically problematic with WordPress) but this one is the essential way. Please correct the problem.

  2. nv1962
    Member
    Posted 3 years ago #

    That's not an issue specific to WP3.1 (or WP3.x for that matter) but has to do with WP attempting to "clean up" markup.

    If you want simple and clean XHTML compliant video embedding, try one of the several outstanding plugin options out there, which allow you to embed a video (self-hosted or on one of the well-known video portals) with a simple shortcode / tag. Again there are several, so just FYI: I personally like XVE and AMP because they're quite tiny and tidy (although Viper's VQ is awesome too).

    The plugin-less alternative is to remember to always embed in the HTML view, and to never change (edit) from the WYSIWYG editor any posts in which you have embedded code.

  3. Also don't switch between HTML and Visual editors :) That way lies madness.

    And it's not WP cleaning up markup, it's TinyMCE, but, yeah, same idea.

    When one enters video embed code in HTML editing, then switches to visual, in order to center the video, it vanishes.

    Check out http://codex.wordpress.org/Embeds

    I never have to enter embed code anymore. Except from CNN.

  4. nv1962
    Member
    Posted 3 years ago #

    And then there's the user profile, too, where you can disable the visual (WYSIWYG) editor altogether. But that's on a per-user basis.

  5. Ayrleig
    Member
    Posted 3 years ago #

    "clean up markup" and the like.....

    Grrrrr wow does that hit a sore spot. I HATE THAT. You'd think WordPress were designed by the megalomaniacs of Microsoft!

    When we enter HTML let us keep it!!!!!!!!!

    (Thanks for the tips. WordPress is very arrogant about this. Maybe taken with themselves and their coding "poetry.")

  6. Ayrleig
    Member
    Posted 3 years ago #

    But, in any of the ways you are describing, does the Visual editor show the space taken up by the video (like it used to, in 3.0x and below)?

    Not to show that block-out is insane.

    Also, I want to preserve my ability to control the height and width of the videos I display. What methods besides posting embed code into the HTML (misnomer) view allow that? Do I have to resort to proprietary "short code?"

    (WordPress is too dumbed-down and turns out to be proprietary and too controlling -- like American society, but that's another matter. That defeats the purpose, since it adds complexity, instead of allowing users to apply portable and standardized techniques, e.g., actual, non-CSS HTML.)

  7. nv1962
    Member
    Posted 3 years ago #

    Check out either XVE or AMP; they are both neat little plugins differing in that AMP has settings for width and height for each of the supported video portals, while XVE allows you to set a unified size for all.

    As to the flash block in the WYSIWYG editor, logic dictates you're looking at that dangerous editor after entering the code in the HTML editor, and I'd think both Isptenu and yours truly already warned against that bad habit. So, don't be surprised about the probability of the results. Also: the WYSIWYG editor has had that same issue since at least the WP2.x series. It's not new. And as Isptenu also points out, technically it's TinyMCE that which provides you the optimal rollercoaster experience whenever you mix point-and-click with nitty-gritty (and hardly standards compliant) HTML hard coding.

    Which brings yours truly to briefly ponder the significance of your inapposite and broad brushed extrapolation in your parenthetical closing remark, rendering further comment obsolete past a casual observation that WordPress, along with many of its plugins and themes, are but a few examples of a quite selfless and open endeavor, placed in your hands for you to use as you see fit.

    For free. By a global community of developers, who deserve a bit more appreciation than inappropriate projections and suppositions can afford.

  8. Ayrleig
    Member
    Posted 3 years ago #

    Thank you, NV.

    Free may mean not profitable, but it doesn't mean free of narcissism or a "let me do for you" elitist attitude. ;-`

    It would be nice if they focused more upon standards and avoiding being self-defeating with one feature canceling another (and canceling good HTML).

  9. Ayrleig - As I said before, it's not WP cleaning up markup, it's TinyMCE, which WP is utilizing for the GUI editor.

    Basically, in order for TinyMCE to correctly parse your HTML, it alters it to ITS standards. That's what you get when you use a tool. Word does it to your documents, too, FWIW. It's nothing to do with 'free' and everything to do with what tool you're using.

  10. Ayrleig
    Member
    Posted 3 years ago #

    Very true that Word does it too. And it is arrogant, whether it comes from Microsoft or WordPress. Microsoft's attempts at thinking for the user are infamous and excellent examples of bad applications software. And it doesn't matter whether WordPress uses someone else's tool or developed it, themselves.

    This is a matter of right and wrong, in how individuals are to be respected and this is wrong.

    What we enter in normal and standard code is what we want to stay there, or we would not enter it. This should need no explanation. Users have no interest in being dumbed-down and treated like herd animals.

    (I bet the people who put this together watch TED videos in their spare time.)

  11. Ayrleig
    Member
    Posted 3 years ago #

    As to the flash block in the WYSIWYG editor, logic dictates you're looking at that dangerous editor after entering the code in the HTML editor, and I'd think both Isptenu and yours truly already warned against that bad habit.

    Good grief.

    What is a "bad habit" is to produce bad applications, where one phase contradicts and cancels another.

  12. nv1962
    Member
    Posted 3 years ago #

    I see. Like the insane contradiction of a gas pedal and a brake pedal, so dangerously placed side by side in cars, right?

    There's a difference between offering choices between alternatives (which WordPress does) and considering the coexistence of those available choices as necessarily and forcibly having a requirement of full compatibility. Hence my waving of the little logic flag.

    You're not under an obligation to use either. In fact, there's another choice, without any need for a plugin you can also submit posts via email and not touch the backend at all.

    Either way I'm sure the people at Moxy look forward to your contribution to improve their freely available code.

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