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WordPress Enterprise for pros follows standards, doesn't break randomly (2 posts)

  1. raymor
    Member
    Posted 3 years ago #

    I have noticed two disturbing trends recently with WordPress.
    I'd like to know what the level of interest might be in a
    solution to these problems. First, a tendency to pander to
    the least knowledgeable person who might install WordPress,
    to the detriment of the professional web site using
    Wordpress, and a tendency to add new features or make changes
    without careful thought, or honestly without so much as 5
    minutes on Google before breaking established protocols, to
    learn WHY professionals have chosen a certain way of doing
    things, before launching off in another direction.

    This has meant that each of the last several upgrades has
    caused major headaches for sites that aren't super simple
    little hobby sites. For example, 3.0 broke, sometimes in subtle ways that might not be immediately noticed, most sites
    using authentication, load balancing, cookies or caching,
    along with many less common techniques related to subdomains, etc.
    All of this to avoid a potential problem if WordPress were installed
    by someone who doesn't know what a "URL" is. My 65 year old
    mother and my 12 year old nephew both know what a URL is, so
    we're really pandering to the clueless here when we're targeting
    people who aren't familiar with what a URL is.
    Professional sites do want to get the latest fixes - especially
    security fixes, but have you noticed how often "updates" seem
    to break things?

    Further, it broke such sites in exactly the same ways that
    we had ample warning of when the "canonical redirects" misfeature
    was added. (Hence the popular 'disable canonical redirects' plugin
    to avoid abuse of fully qualified URLs which break so many things).
    So we knew exactly what would happen if we intentionally misused fully qualified URLs - all of these professional sites,
    sites that use things like authentication, caching, etc.
    would break, in order to make it easier for a six year old
    to set up WordPress.

    If the mainline WordPress wants to pander to the newbie setting
    up their first web site, and also wants to make changes that
    affect every single page load without thought of what the
    consequences of breaking well established protocols might be,
    perhaps professionals need a separate version, ala Fedora and Red Hat Enterprise Linux.

    Perhaps what's needed is a WordPress Enterprise fork, and let the
    mainline WordPress pander to the lowest common denominator, which
    seems to be the trend, and introduce "cool" new features without
    regard for established standards and how many professional sites
    are broken by these spontaneous changes. The Enterprise version
    could be aimed at true professionals and follow standards, and
    avoid breaking compatibility with established protocols.
    I am very much considering launching such a fork. It would
    save hundreds of hours compared to going back and reverting
    spontaneous standards breaking changes every time there is a
    Wordpress update. How much interest is there in a version of
    Wordpress which would continue to work, on a professional site
    even, and you could get updates that a) fix security problems
    b) fix actual bugs and c) add well tested features without
    adding untested beta quality "features" that break your site?
    Would such a WordPress Enterprise project be of interest to the community?

  2. For example, 3.0 broke, sometimes in subtle ways that might not be immediately noticed, most sites
    using authentication, load balancing, cookies or caching,
    along with many less common techniques related to subdomains, etc.

    Like ... what?

    Not to put too fine a point to it, but have you ever seen SOFTWARE that didn't break something someone did? No two people use WordPress the exact same way, so it's hell on wheels to try and cover everything. Microsoft sure doesn't. When they upgrade their OS and apps break, well, the app has to scramble to make a patch. This is how the world works. Not for better or worse, mind :/

    Also ... Welcome to Open Source. The testers are the people who are willing to try the bleeding edge software. Which means if people who don't have YOUR particular setup don't test, then it doesn't get tested. You should consider coming over to the dark side and join us beta testing :)

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