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WordPress Blog vs. WordPress CMS (26 posts)

  1. paticoflange
    Member
    Posted 9 years ago #

    I've been playing with WordPress for a little over a month now. I've learned a lot and I owe most of that to this forum as well as the intuitive design of WordPress.
    That said, I think I'm going to be moving on to Mambo (or another heavier-duty CMS). Why? Because I was never going to use WordPress as a blog. I use Livejournal for my blog needs (have been since 2000) and was looking to use WordPress as a CMS for a graphic-intensive video download site.
    I found myself, more and more, disabling built-in WordPress features (RSS feeds, calender, comments) and spending a lot of time looking for hacks and plugins to do all of the things I wanted. My index.php is barely recognizable.
    Looking down the road, I believe it would be less than efficient to build everything in WordPress. Nobody wants me in these forums begging for a shopping-cart plugin! Yes the line between Blog and CMS is blurry, but there ARE some differences. I guess, in the end, I look at it like this: if your site looks more like a portal than a diary, than using blog software is probably not in your best interest.
    I've seen portal sites built with WordPress, but they still lack so much of the functionality I will want to have. I plan on trolling the WordPress forums still, and if I ever decide port my livejournal to an independent blog, I know exactly what I'll be using.
    Thanks!

  2. Root
    Member
    Posted 9 years ago #

    Well an egg laying wooly milk pig would be kinda useful :)

  3. serendipity
    Member
    Posted 9 years ago #

    Well, the egg-laying would interfere with the milk production and vice versa, and both with the quality of the wool. And you'd never know when to slaughter it.
    IOW, it would be as if everyone had just one piece of software installed that does everything (even what you don't need), and nothing really well. Oh, mind you, this isn't an utopia, but exactly what a hugely "successful" software giant that shall remain unnamed tries to convince the entire world of.

  4. NuclearMoose
    Member
    Posted 9 years ago #

    Hmm...
    Serendipity, does that make me an eierlegende Wollmilchelch by any chance? :)
    *hugs*

  5. serendipity
    Member
    Posted 9 years ago #

    I prefer you as Atomelch. You're good at that. How good are you at laying eggs?

  6. davidchait
    Member
    Posted 9 years ago #

    I've used WP as a CMS-oriented site for a while now. No complaints. Much more flexible than something like Mambo. Plugins are coming bit by bit, based on need...
    -d

  7. OperaManiac
    Member
    Posted 9 years ago #

    just a question... if i dont use WP as a blog, am i morally misusing WP? :O)

  8. nstead
    Member
    Posted 9 years ago #

    I'm using WP as a limited CMS on my site, and I agree to some extent with paticoflange. My index.php and CSS has been completely rewritten, and I've got almost a dozen plugins and hacks, some of which have been taken from other people, and some of which I've hacked myself.
    I looked at a few CMS systems, but none of them seemed to give me exactly what I wanted, and the big advantage of WP is that it's reasonably simple to learn to hack.
    The reason for all the hacks and plugins is that I want to allow users who are not at all computer-savvy to post articles. I don't want them to have to learn about the intricacies of (X)HTML, CSS, RSS, Pingbacks, Trackbacks, and the like, otherwise no-one will make any posts.
    WP is working well for me, but I dread the day that WP1.3 is released - upgrading is going to be a nightmare!

  9. Root
    Member
    Posted 9 years ago #

    Could anyone explain to me how much knowledge of xhtml, CSS, pingbacks trackbacks and the like are needed to post an article ?

  10. OperaManiac
    Member
    Posted 9 years ago #

    heh... life is a mess mate... people lose common sense in the maze of technology.

  11. sicro
    Member
    Posted 9 years ago #

    @paticoflange:
    interesting point. I was just going to post a question about how WP could meet my CMS needs, maybe I should think again. But as you said, the line between Blog and CMS is blurry and thin, and for now I'll stay on this side of the chalk.

  12. TechGnome
    Moderator
    Posted 9 years ago #

    Sushubh wrote:

    just a question... if i dont use WP as a blog, am i morally misusing WP? :O)

    Only if you are touching it in places where you shouldn't and in ways that make WP feel uncomfortable. ;P
    I disagree about the blurring of CMS and Blogs. They server two distinctly different needs. I have another site all about development (warning shamelss plug at DeveloperKB.com and I would NEVER for a moment consider something like WP to run. A CMS has to be much more powerful than this. There's more to it than "posting articles" there's user management, communications, and things like that. Now, WP is easy to manipulate, and easy to learn, so I see the apeal in using for something like a CMS, but one thing I've learned over the past years, is that just because you can do something doesn't mean you should do it.
    TG

  13. Ozh
    Member
    Posted 9 years ago #

    For me, CMS meaning "Content Management System", anything web-based that can manage content is a CMS. WP being able to post things, modify things, upload files, edit files, WP *is* a CMS.
    What WP isn't good at (because not designed for it) is managing a community site : there you need multi user support, forum, and all sort of community stuff that are not that easy to integrate into WP.

  14. davidchait
    Member
    Posted 9 years ago #

    A 'CMS' "has to be" whatever the user needs it to be. ;)
    Certainly, there are enough pieces of the puzzle available to technical WP folks to use it as a 'full blown' CMS. For the average user, it's a 'CMS-lite' solution.
    Content Management is overused... Any system that manages simple input and display of content is a kind of CMS. I've heard of corporations using blogs for internal CMS systems, just because they are easier/simpler. Again, depends wholly upon the needs of the user.
    -d

  15. davidchait
    Member
    Posted 9 years ago #

    Root -
    Absolutely zero. If you don't want to know, you certainly don't have to.
    Having some concept of what each term means (glossary), and how they fit the overall scheme of building a web page and interacting with users and sites on the net... well, that's useful the more you want to know, and want to do.. ;)
    -d

  16. TechGnome
    Moderator
    Posted 9 years ago #

    I think this is the part that Root was questioning:

    The reason for all the hacks and plugins is that I want to allow users who are not at all computer-savvy to post articles. I don't want them to have to learn about the intricacies of (X)HTML, CSS, RSS, Pingbacks, Trackbacks, and the like, otherwise no-one will make any posts.

    David - I see your point about CMS's being what ever the user needs them to be, and in that definition WP is a CMS.... but then so is Word, and Visiual Studio for that matter then.
    TG

  17. divrom
    Member
    Posted 9 years ago #

    I used WP for a friends church website. He knows zero HTML, but can use word. So, I jigged with the admin page so that it would be familiar and - hey presto! - he has a CMS that he can use to power his whole website.
    WP is great!

  18. OperaManiac
    Member
    Posted 9 years ago #

    well, i am comfortable using WP for a lot of online stuff. and I do link to WP site from all teh sites. But they are not all blogs. So, thats why I asked.

  19. tommy_is_here
    Member
    Posted 8 years ago #

    Regarding using WP for CMS, can I clarify with you folks what this really means? When WP added the pages functionality, this allowed folks to put up 'timeless' elements on a site, and through the admin interface, let non-technical users update the pages. (ie. non-techies could manage their website that way) Is this the basic essence of what 'using WP as a CMS' really mean, or am I missing something?

    Cheers,
    Tommy

  20. moshu
    Member
    Posted 8 years ago #

    Tommy, you can certainly clarify it... but this thread isn't a "timeless" element for sure - the last post before yours is from August 2004!
    Since then several WP version came out, so it's quite irrelevant.

  21. OfficialScorer
    Member
    Posted 8 years ago #

    Interestingly, I am moving from a CMS to WP. While there will be some things I "lose" in the transition, what I plan on gaining out-weigh those loses.

    My content are my blog posts. Being able to tag those, have pingbacks, etc. are more important than having some of features in e107. And I suspect that as I get into WP more, I'll find most of what I am giving up can be done in WP.

  22. likoma
    Member
    Posted 8 years ago #

    Paticoflange,

    Thanks for your question and I hope you post your findings here later after you've used another CMS or WP or whatever you do as I'm often in the same boat as you are (need more than WP can offer). I'd very much like to know what you choose (Mambo, Drupal, etc.).

    There are some examples of sites that use WP that aren't blogs on this topic. I also mention at that topic how I've been using Drupal for my more "community" sites, but any of them I can move to WP I am in the middle of. I tell my clients that "The best software (or tool) is the one you know how to use."

    I've spent about a year working with Drupal and about two years with WP and I keep coming back to WP. It's just so much easier for me--and my clients--to work with.

    When it came time for the users/members of one of my CMS (non-WP) sites to add an image and it took a phone call and a help video, I knew it was time to move the site to WP.

    Again, please post your experiences here.

    Best regards,

    - Bradley

  23. Jonas Grønås Drange
    Member
    Posted 8 years ago #

    Like likoma, I keep falling back to WordPress. I've spent some time with "real" CMSs like Drupal, Plone, Modx, Typo3 and Mambo, but everything is indeed bloated, too hard for clients to use and a waste of time configurating. (For the mainstream customers like small enterprises etc.)

    With the CMS listed above, it's about downsizing and configurating functions. With WordPress it's about adding and configurating. I like the latter because it never gets messy.

    Heavy CMSs like Plone and Typo3 has it's uses, but Nasa is currently not in my clientele. When that time comes, I will concider something heavier than WordPress - if there's no wp-heavy-CMS-plugin yet, of course.

    Go WordPress!

  24. Nnyan
    Member
    Posted 8 years ago #

    I actually was just playing around with various CMS scripts when I ran into WP. Not a CMS but I thought I would give it a whirl and see what happened.

    What I found is that I really really loved WP, not sure what hooked me but I just really like the look and fee. Its very polished and I like the way it "does" most things.

    Now the bad. If you're not looking for just a blog then you quickly run into a wall. You have to start hacking and making compromises. Which I know some people will say WP is what it is. But I think that misses the point. WP could be so much more and you can do it via plugins, those that don't want a feature don't have to use it.

    I for one require a forum (and yes punBB is great but getting it imbedded into a theme is hit or miss), a photogallery, event calendar and a wrapper (allows you to imbed other scripts inside your WP site). More often then not I find myself having to settle for something I like less then WP b/c WP can't do what I want it to do without turning myself inside out.

  25. astereo
    Member
    Posted 8 years ago #

    WordPress can be as functional as any cms. There are great exmaples around of WordPress being used in other non-blog forms.

    + aj | http://www.devlounge.net

  26. RuddO
    Member
    Posted 7 years ago #

    I'm actually selling a CMS solution based on WordPress. It's not heavy duty at all, but it covers most of Web site builders' needs (and sure as hell bloggers' as well). I'll be building more CMS-oriented features slowly. Time is scarce, you know!

    It's called Turbocharged.

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