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WibWabWeb.com - is this legal? (7 posts)

  1. p0mmeluff
    Member
    Posted 2 years ago #

    I just stumbled over this website: http://www.wibwabweb.com/

    They are offering a hosting package combined with a modified / rebranded WordPress and lots of Themes of which I know that most of them are not made by them. I assume that they also "nulled" / rebranded these themes, like they did with WordPress and claim that they are their own property.. Making money with other peoples's work.

    It this legal?

  2. Legal, yes. Ethical and moral? That's subjective. To me, no, to other people though...

    GPL freedoms mean they can do exactly that.

  3. p0mmeluff
    Member
    Posted 2 years ago #

    Oh, boy ... Things like that drive me nuts.

    Themes from sites that support non-GPL (or compatible) themes or violate the WordPress community guidelines themes will not be approved.

    Okay, so this seems to be the reason not to submit any themes to wordpress.org ...
    (For me) It's fine to share themes / software / ... for free with the community, spread the word, let them modify it, as long as they share alike. Just like a CC BY-NC-SA. But a (forced) GPL-call-me-stupid-and-do-whatever-you-want-license? No, thanks.

    Too bad, wordpress.org is (obviously) the best known and biggest place to go for themes. I hope someday they will allow themes submitted under other rather "open" licenses.

  4. You're gonna hate it more.

    Any WordPress theme that is non-GPL complicant is illegal. Current precedent is that since WordPress is GPL and a theme is derivative work, all themes are GPL.

    Read this: http://ottopress.com/2011/why-you-should-use-gpl-for-commercial-themes/

    Don't sell the theme, sell the help :)

  5. p0mmeluff
    Member
    Posted 2 years ago #

    Well, yes. There is some truth behind it. Pirates always find a ship to capture.

    But I'm not talking about selling themes. I'm talking about rights. I'm totally fine with giving away themes or >apply anything you think of< for free, but with some conditions — at least for those who follow them.

    I know, there are always some guys who claim other people's work as their own, rip websites, crack games, share movies, ... , but there are still x percent who follow the conditions. That's no reason to categorically say "do whatever you want with it - I don't care". Therefore, in my opinion, other licenses which don't grant all rights, are justified, anyway. Otherwise there would be no reason to sell anything (digital) anymore.

    By the way - talking about licenses - is CC a GPL-compatible license or not? I ofter read contradictory statements about it ...

  6. I'm talking about rights as well. Check out http://wordpress.org/about/philosophy/

    WordPress is licensed under the General Public License (GPLv2 or later) which provides four core freedoms, consider this as the WordPress "bill of rights":

    The freedom to run the program, for any purpose.
    The freedom to study how the program works, and change it to make it do what you wish.
    The freedom to redistribute.
    The freedom to distribute copies of your modified versions to others.
    Part of those licensing requirements include licensing derivative works or things that link core WordPress functions (like themes, plugins, etc.) under the GPL as well, thereby passing on the freedom of use for these works as well.

    Obviously there are those who will try to get around these ideals and restrict the freedom of their users by trying to find loopholes or somehow circumvent the intention of the WordPress licensing, which is to ensure freedom of use. We believe that the community as a whole will reward those who focus on supporting these licensing freedoms instead of trying to avoid them.

    The most responsible use of WordPress community resources would therefore be put to best use by emphasizing high quality contributions that embrace the freedoms provided by the GPL

    As for CC vs GPL, they're not exactly compatible, but we;re talking about different things. See GPL applies ONLY to the code. CC applies to your content. The two are separate entities, legally, and you always retain 100% legal rights to what you write.

    Otherwise there would be no reason to sell anything (digital) anymore.

    Personally? I don't think we should be selling software like we do physical items (like a TV), but instead sell the service.

  7. p0mmeluff
    Member
    Posted 2 years ago #

    Thanks for your replies, Ipstenu.

    I am going to reconsider my view as you gave me something to think about.

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