WordPress.org

Ready to get started?Download WordPress

Forums

themes and the blog network (5 posts)

  1. rogerwhitson
    Member
    Posted 4 years ago #

    Hi everyone,

    I've enabled the blog network for WordPress 3.0. When I go to a blog I created on the blog network, the blog shows up but I don't have any theme. Here's an example:

    http://britts.lcc.gatech.edu/rogerwhitson/

    I looked through the WordPress site, and I found a discussion about adding AllowOverride FileInfo Options to Apache's vhost configurations.

    I talked to the people who run my server (it's a Linux server), and she said that there was a different problem. Here's the email from her:

    "I pulled a log of the site and put it into Excel format for easy reading. "404" not-found errors abound, but there's a "200" OK return for the main page. The not-founds are looking for CSS stylesheets at locations that don't exist, because they're searching starting at the network blog-name as the top of the hierarchy:

    GET /rogerwhitson/wp-content/themes/twentyten/style.css HTTP/1.1
    -----------------------------------

    So the 200 OK return is for a "fake" URL being referred to by http://britts.lcc.gatech.edu/wp-admin/my-sites.php -- this mysites.php page is correctly translating the "blog" click from the main page into whatever we're seeing as "http://britts.lcc.gatech.edu/rogerwhitson"

    However, then the page that's supposed to be your blog is asking for stuff that doesn't exist. That implies that something's not configured right. It doesn't look like an .htaccess problem from here.

    Could there be a setting within the admin interface (perhaps actually ON the my-sites.php page, or elsewhere within the plugin config) that tells the subordinate blogs where you specify the "top" of the hierarchy, or some sort of path variable that you need to set?"

    Any suggestions for resolving this problem?

    Thanks.

  2. However, then the page that's supposed to be your blog is asking for stuff that doesn't exist. That implies that something's not configured right. It doesn't look like an .htaccess problem from here.

    It *is* an htaccess problem. It's looking for non-existent file son the server because it uses htaccess rules to build (and find) those links.

    Sometimes mod_rewrite will let the permalinks work to posts, but not to things like stylesheets, images and (you may have discovered this or not) denying access to the sub-sites admin area.

    Path variables aren't set with WordPress for this. It's mostly server config.

    While I hadn't dug around enough to see it stuffing the blog name out front like that, I *do* know that AllowOverride fixes it.

  3. rogerwhitson
    Member
    Posted 3 years ago #

    Here's the response from my server people:

    I double-checked the httpd.conf, just to be thorough, and AllowOverride on the entire britts directory is set to 'all.' I believe that if the problem were there, none of your rewrites would work.

    If there's no config from the admin interface, and the config on the httpd.conf is working, then the only other place to look is in your .htaccess files. I notice that the only such file is at the top of the britts directory, and that it's working properly (if you remove it, the blog farm goes 404, so it's doing at least one rewrite successfully).

    So we've eliminated our possible culprits to the point that the only causes of the problem are a) your top-level .htaccess file is missing some rewrite rules, or b) there are subsequent .htaccess files needed at some other level, which do not exist.

    Do the network's setup instructions call for multiple .htaccess files? Do they call for edits to the main one? I know that one .htaccess file got deleted accidentally. So it's possible that some of your changes got rolled back at that time.

    So, it seems that I already have AllowOveride? Could there be another problem?

  4. annahbrown
    Member
    Posted 3 years ago #

    I am having this issue as well.

  5. Do the network's setup instructions call for multiple .htaccess files? Do they call for edits to the main one? I know that one .htaccess file got deleted accidentally. So it's possible that some of your changes got rolled back at that time.

    The network activation calls for edits to the MAIN .htaccess file in the root of the install.

    Look at the code in the amdin area under Tools -> Network. Compare it to the .htaccess file you have in the same folder as the install's wp-config file.

Topic Closed

This topic has been closed to new replies.

About this Topic