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RSS Dummy (12 posts)

  1. DavidDeCristoforo
    Member
    Posted 9 years ago #

    It seems like I just saw this answered in a recent post but now I can't seem to find it. Anyway, I want to use the RSS feature built into WP (v1.2). As I understand it, subscribers would hit mysite,com/feeds...right? And there was something about needing permalinks working in order for people to get the feeds? As you can tell, once again I'm over my head, but what the heck....A pointer to any tutorials?

    Thanx
    DD

  2. Kiddeath91
    Member
    Posted 9 years ago #

    If you look in your header, you should see your feeds that WP has created for you:

    <link rel="alternate" type="application/rss+xml" title="RSS 2.0" href="this is your rss link" />

    Yes, I believe that you need permalinks enabled for this.

  3. You feed should be at domain.com/<wordpress directory>/wp-rss2.php . If you have permalinks activated, it will be at domain.com/<wordpress directory>/feed/rss2/ . You do not need to have permalinks active. domain.com/<wordpress directory>/wp-rss2.php will work just fine.

  4. DavidDeCristoforo
    Member
    Posted 9 years ago #

    OK, now it's time to reveal how much of a "dummy" I really am! What do you mean by "look in my header"? Is a feed created each time I post something to my blog? And how to "enable permalinks"? And can someone "get" the feeds with a news reader that is pointed to mysite,com/feeds?

    Sorry if this seems too basic but I really do appreciate the help!

    DD

  5. DavidDeCristoforo
    Member
    Posted 9 years ago #

    OK, now it's time to reveal how much of a "dummy" I really am! What do you mean by "look in my header"? Is a feed created each time I post something to my blog? And how to "enable permalinks"? And can someone "get" the feeds with a news reader that is pointed to mysite,com/feeds?

    Sorry if this seems too basic but I really do appreciate the help!

    DD

  6. Kiddeath91
    Member
    Posted 9 years ago #

    Go with macmanx suggestion.

    If you have permalinks active:

    yourdomain.com/wordpress directory/feed/rss2/

    If not:

    yourdomain.com/wordpress directory/wp-rss2.php

    Your header is all the code between the <head></head> tags when you view your source html code.

  7. DavidDeCristoforo
    Member
    Posted 9 years ago #

    Gotcha. I'll give it a run...thanx much again for the help. I took a look at the header to see what you were referring to and, yup, sure enough there it is, just like you said it would be! This is so cool!

    DD

  8. DavidDeCristoforo
    Member
    Posted 9 years ago #

    Well that was easy enough! Now could someone explain (in VERY simple terms please!) the advantages (or dis-advantages) of having permalinks enabled?

    Thanx Again (and again)
    DD

  9. Avenir
    Member
    Posted 9 years ago #

    Without pretty permalinks active, a link to a particular entry on your blog will have a long PHP query string attached to end of it which makes it hard to remember what the link is. With pretty permalinks enabled, these long query strings get turned into readable "directories" that make it easy to remember what the post's individual page link is.

    So, without pretty permalinks, a link might look like:
    you.com/index.php?y=2005&m=03&d=12 (I don't actually know the variables, but yea...)

    But with pretty permalinks, the link would be:
    you.com/2005/03/12/post-title/ (assuming you use the suggested structure)

    Basically, pretty permalinks make your URI's look nicer. They have no real advantage.

  10. michaelc
    Member
    Posted 9 years ago #

    Permalinks used to be necessary to get your pages into Google (Google didn't like dynamic URLs). That's no longer the case, although it still may be an issue with other search engines.

    "Permalinks" is kind of a misnomer - unless you mess with your database, the "non-permalink" URLs should remain just as "permanent."

    They look nicer, and they allow users to find categories, archives, etc., easier, using logical paths, although you may not want that.

    No real disadvantages I can think of that aren't also problems with "non-permalinks." Accidentally nuking your .htaccess, I guess, but you can always rebuild that.

  11. DavidDeCristoforo
    Member
    Posted 9 years ago #

    So, if someone were to bookmark a particular post they would be able to access it later (without permalinks), even after it's been archived?

    DD

  12. michaelc
    Member
    Posted 9 years ago #

    Yes, a non-permalink bookmark should work.

    And in WP, from what I've seen "non-permalinks" aren't all that convoluted. In fact, they may be shorter than the permalinks!

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