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Responsive-Design Plugins Compatibility (7 posts)

  1. Shapeshifter 3
    Member
    Posted 2 years ago #

    Arf!

    Ok, this is a dream or wish....not a complaint.

    I'm using a 3-column Framework/Child Theme (PressWork) that I like, and want to keep. I just added the "WP Resolutions Plugin" and I'm not sure if it works or not........but that's not really my concern. What is confusing is that I'm not sure if the WP-Touch, and other WordPress Plugins that I already have installed are (or will) conflict with my new Plugin. My goal is to eventually get "Mobile First Responsive" with my website's 3-column theme. Many "Responsive Design Themes" seem to be only 2-column.

    I would like an intensive comparison of all WordPress Plugins and/or Themes that result in best-case scenarios for Smart Phone, Tablet, and Desktop displays. I think that WordPress Developers & Members ought to put more time into this (a polite request....not a demand) to meet the market of mobile sales.

    Does anybody else share my wish? I'm wondering how many different Adaptive, Responsive, and/or Mobile First Plugins & Themes won't be compatible with each other if enabled at the same time.

    I already seem to have conflicts with the caching features of various WP Plugins. Some of my randomly displayed Header Images (15) don't display. WP Minify, WP Supercache, and WP Resolutions (basically an "Adaptive Images" plugin) all have caching features and I wonder if they are conflicting with each other. Maybe I should disable one or two.

    Just some thoughts.

  2. Presscreate
    Member
    Posted 2 years ago #

    hello,
    I love this post because this is what I am struggling with, where can I reach you, you can send me an email by clicking on my profile or let me know what you found out. thanks Presscreate

  3. Shapeshifter 3
    Member
    Posted 2 years ago #

    Presscreate,

    Before I tell you what I've done, understand that WordPress Core, Framework, and Theme Developers have no Standard Definition (as of yet) for what Responsive Web Design should or should not be. That's because users have different goals and developers haven't figure out what the majority of users want. Current plugins offer different features, and there doesn't appear to be an agreed-upon Standard Collection of Plugins integrated into the WordPress Core. Most Core Developers seem to think that Mobile Responsive Design is a Theme issue, and NOT a Core solution. That said, here's what I've done:

    1.) I moved my website from a 3-column to 2-column theme.
    (I did that to make it easier for mobile devices to vertically
    stack only 5-6 items on Smart Phones).

    2.) I got rid of All of my Header Images in order to reduce the
    total vertical length (from Top to Bottom) of my site on Smart
    Phones.

    3.) I converted all of my Post Categories to Tags that show up in a
    lower section of Smart Phones.

    4.) I installed plugins that Scale Images, Text & Videos to the
    screen sizes of Smart Phones.

    5.) I disabled and deleted the WPtouch Plugin from my site, because
    I wanted my website to be displayed on Smart Phones as close as
    to a Desktop display as possible INSTEAD OF a mobile theme. That
    solution may, or may not fit your needs.

    6.) I disabled and deleted the WP Resolutions plugin since I came to
    decision that I din't need it (it is a WordPress version of the
    "Adaptive Images" combo of code. It seems to be difficult to
    use, but a Great Idea).

    7.) I used a Mobile Responsive Layout Tester
    Screenfly
    to constant review my progress.

    8.) Here's a link to a Post I wrote back on January 29th, 2012
    Mobile Emulator or Layout Testing Tool

    9.) Of those Plugins, I'm only using numbers: 1,2,3, and 5. You
    can check how my site looks on a Mobile Device by Copy and
    Pasting Toolbox-4-Websites.com into Screenfly.

    10.) My Top Navigational Menu has quite a few links to useful code
    you may want to try.

    Hope this helps. In the future, I would like to go back to a 3-column layout that scales itself properly to a Smart Phone. I haven't taken enough time to complete that yet.

  4. Presscreate
    Member
    Posted 2 years ago #

    Shapeshifter 3
    Hello,
    That is helpful thank you, any thoughts on the genesis theme that has just come out called Eleven40 which is responsive?
    I haven't built the website yet and will use a child theme so I am thinking of this one because of the fact that it is responsive, also I will use for ecommerce a cloud based plugin for wp, I don't know how this will look on a mobile device?
    Any thoughts on this?
    Thanks again.
    Presscreate
    P.S. love the image of your border collie- they are so smart!

  5. Shapeshifter 3
    Member
    Posted 2 years ago #

    Presscreate,

    Please excuse me for not getting back to you earlier. I've had some personal & work issues I had to attend to.

    In regards to the Genesis/Eleven40 child theme choice; I think it is good one with a slight caveat: Your Content AND the Plugins you use matter. The founder of Genesis is way ahead of some other WordPress Framework developers because he has already stated that over time ALL of their current Child Themes will be converted to Mobile Responsive. The founders of Theme Hybrid and Suffusion have made recent comments that they don't believe that Mobile Responsive Design is necessary and see it as a Trend that may or may not come to Fruition. So currently your choice is a good one and safe.

    Back to your Content. If you look at the layout tool that Genesis recommends for that the Eleven40 theme MattKersley.com, you will notice that the vertical length of your site's content can get quite long. I don't know what, or how much Content your new website will have, but if it is too long, the viewer(s) might just blow past it. This has nothing to do with the Theme, but how much content you choose to display on a mobile device.

    I was in a Best Buy store yesterday and asked a couple in their mid-twenties to review my website. What they DIDN'T LIKE was my Tag Cloud that displays near the bottom of smartphone screens. Both the man and his girlfriend stated that the cloud looked too much like a paragraph they didn't want to take the time to read....and blew past it. So it wasn't the Theme (Twenty Eleven) they didn't like. It was the way that part of my Content was designed (they had no idea what Tags were, and didn't care).

    Lastly, before you purchase that Genesis theme, try to find out what eCommerce plugins it will support. I didn't research it for you..Sorry.

  6. Shapeshifter 3
    Member
    Posted 2 years ago #

    Presscreate,

    An addendum to my previous response:

    1.) Make yourself a list of all of the plugins that you think that you will need to use.

    2.) See if your chosen Theme already provides some of those features.

    3.) I would bet that a large number of plugins WILL NOT display properly on a smart phone (I'm using Google's Translate script that is too long for a smart phone. The viewer can't access the drop-down menu.)

    4.) If a particular plugin doesn't work; access the plugin's Support Forum for possible solutions; OR find a different Plugin that will do the job.

  7. Ultrawang
    Member
    Posted 2 years ago #

    Hey guys just noticed you were searching for the same functions. I've just found this plugin which seems to work fine for serving up responsive images:
    http://wordpress.org/extend/plugins/wp-fluid-images/
    Cheers :)

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