WordPress.org

Ready to get started?Download WordPress

Forums

Publishing a page so ONLY the client can view it. (3 posts)

  1. bcerz811
    Member
    Posted 2 years ago #

    I am a graphic and web designer. I am a self taught amateur developer. I never thought I would need coding skills, but when I started doing freelance work, my husband (who is a programmer) helped me learn HTML, CSS and even some javascript. I now have a solid understanding of HTML and CSS and can develop a site just fine. Now, though, I have been hired into a very small marketing company that does graphic design and web design and development for small businesses. One of the things they want to do is put their sites into a CMS for clients so they can update it themselves if they want to. So now I am learning wordpress and how to create custom themes. I am still very new at this, so please be patient with me if my question sounds very obvious. This is actually not a coding question, but a wordpress function question. I searched the forum and the codex and I have not been able to find an answer to this problem.

    We have a client who through a previous designer had a site designed and developed in wordpress. The previous designer downloaded an already developed wordpress theme and is using it. The site is not strictly a blog site. It is a website that does have a blog function, but the main site is a catalog site. They were originally supposed to be able to do all their updates themselves through the dashboard, but have found they do not want to and do not have the time. So they've handed it over to my company since the previous designer has signed off on the project.

    They would like a new page added with content they have supplied. This is easy to do and I have done it, however they do not want it "live" until they can review it. But they also do not want to have to sign into their admin to view the page through the dashboard. So...I'm at a loss. I cannot publish the page because they don't want it on the web, but they can't get to it without using the dashboard and logging in--which they don't want to do. The closest solution I have come up with is to publish the page, but set it so that it does not show up in any navigation or links on the site. The only way to get to it is to give them the permalink. The problem is, the page is still technically on the web and it is possible it could still be found through a google search. Is there a way around this? A way to view a not published page before it goes live without having to log into wordpress and navigate through the dashboard to find it? Maybe a plug in?

    The site is http://www.accoxford.com if anyone is interested. The theme that the previous designer used is called Private Lawyer.

    Sorry if this has been covered, or if there is an obvious answer I"m not seeing. I'm new to this so I'm still learning. Thanks

    Rebecca

  2. Jackson
    Member
    Posted 2 years ago #

    Generally, pages are indexed by search engines because they are linked to from other pages. So if you have no inbound links to your page, Google doesn't know it exists - unless you're submitting a site map.

    You could try visibility > password protected to assign a simple password needed to view the page content.

    http://en.support.wordpress.com/pages/page-visibility/

    .com support, but the steps are the same

  3. Why not set the page status to password-protected? You'll need to provide the password to your client, of course, but they won't have to log into the admin side, it's just for the one page.

    http://codex.wordpress.org/Content_Visibility#Password_Protected_Content

    But they also do not want to have to sign into their admin to view the page through the dashboard.

    Why not?

    The other thing to do, which is an essential part of developing WordPress sites, is to set up a "staging server." This is where you would show work in development to clients, and the entire site would be password-protected. Of course this takes a bit of time, but I recommend you consider it as standard practice in the future.

Topic Closed

This topic has been closed to new replies.

About this Topic