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Please slow down new versions....... (19 posts)

  1. maurizio04
    Member
    Posted 6 years ago #

    3 month for a new major version is just too short.
    Look at Micro$oft :-)

    I would be happy with 2 yearly version well tested!
    -m

  2. ThePopulist
    Member
    Posted 6 years ago #

    LOL....

  3. mrkingid
    Member
    Posted 6 years ago #

    What? Really? 3 months is an eternity in software development.

    M$ took years working on VISTA and look what a piece of $hit that is.

    I like the short rev cycle of WP!!!

  4. Lee Penney
    Member
    Posted 6 years ago #

    Not so easy to deal with when you've got 10 sites to update, test the themes, plugins, remember if you've made any customisations or modifications to core files...

    2 years is probably pushing it 9-12 months would work fine, or, as has been requested, a simpler method of upgrading (e.g. auto-update, or at least just a package with changed files).

  5. Chris_K
    Member
    Posted 6 years ago #

    I've been using this script on a server with 3 installs. Priceless and painless.

    http://www.thecodecave.com/EasyWPUpdate

  6. maurizio04
    Member
    Posted 6 years ago #

    3 month for a new major version is just too short.
    Look at Micro$oft :-)

    I would be happy with 2 yearly version well tested!
    -m

    sorry for my english, i was suggesting a 6 month minimum time between versions. if the devs go faster people will remain behind, updates of a full blog are complex...not to mention themes incompatibilities....

  7. EricSchulz
    Member
    Posted 6 years ago #

    No one is forcing you to upgrade to the latest version. Would you rather use software with security holes than one that is updated frequently?

  8. Jonathan Landrum
    Member
    Posted 6 years ago #

    Subversion

  9. worldby
    Member
    Posted 6 years ago #

    I also would be happy with 2 yearly version well tested!

  10. TravisSeitler
    Member
    Posted 6 years ago #

    "No one is forcing you to upgrade to the latest version. Would you rather use software with security holes than one that is updated frequently?"

    Actually, it would be nice if "security patches" (only containing the altered files) were released when holes were fixed. As it stands, the minor update process is pretty clunky---unless, as jonlandrum mentioned, you're using SVN. But not everyone has sufficient server access to run SVN. Sure, they could switch to more expensive hosting plans which would allow them to take advantage of subversion's benefits, but if they had such money available, why would they be so gung-ho about using free software? ;)

    Also, SVN doesn't address the plugin incompatibility issues. If anything, it would only serve to exacerbate that issue.

  11. erick_paper
    Member
    Posted 6 years ago #

    There's no need to install any script.

    Use the subversion thing. Then set up a cron job to "svn up". That's it. No more worrying.

  12. wpnety
    Member
    Posted 6 years ago #

    I still use wp2.2, and did not upgrade to version 2.3.

  13. Stevish
    Member
    Posted 6 years ago #

    wpnety,

    I had the same approach about my site until recently. I figured that I liked the way my site worked, and I didn't feel like updating my theme (which I wrote, so I couldn't just wait for the developer to come out with a new one). so I kept the same version of WP for a little over a year and a half.

    then one day, all of a sudden, I received thousands of bounced E-mails that had been sent from my E-mail server that I never wrote. My site had been hacked and used to send out tens of thousands of phishing E-mails, and my host shut off my account within the hour. That took a lot of time and energy to recover from, not to mention, it put me on thin ice with my host. It could have been a lot worse. If they had been more malicious, they could have used their security breach as a foothold to hack into my hosts shared server, and destroy hundreds of accounts. That would have gotten me kicked out for sure.

  14. wpnety
    Member
    Posted 6 years ago #

    my puppys site also kept the same version of WP for a little over a year and a half. I have to upgrade to new versions already.

  15. whooami
    Member
    Posted 6 years ago #

    thats not a wordpress site, why are you spamming these forums with a non wordpress site, wpnety?

  16. wpnety
    Member
    Posted 6 years ago #

    Sorry , just now enter a wrong site.
    here: http://hevin.com.cn, this is latest version site.

  17. StrangeAttractor
    Member
    Posted 6 years ago #

    Actually, it would be nice if "security patches" (only containing the altered files) were released when holes were fixed. As it stands, the minor update process is pretty clunky

    This is my personal beef with WordPress, although I love it otherwise. I really hate that feature upgrades are tied in with security upgrades. I know I'm not the only one, but it doesn't seem to be a particular priority with the main developers. I can understand that it's a logistical difficulty for an open-source application. But I keep hoping...

  18. scribblerguy
    Member
    Posted 6 years ago #

    I really hate that feature upgrades are tied in with security upgrades.

    They're not. You just have to choose the right version.

    From: wordpress.org/download/legacy/ -- Legacy 2.0 Branch

    In keeping with the stable/testing release philosophy of Debian we have committed to maintaining our 2.0 branch with security and critical fixes until 2010. (Yes that’s 5 years after it was originally released in 2005.)

    * * *

    But I keep hoping...

    Don't just "keep hoping." Act. -- Where there's demand, there's a business opportunity (or at least a mini open source project).

  19. rawalex
    Member
    Posted 6 years ago #

    I posted elsewhere, but I have to agree with the "I really hate that feature upgrades are tied in with security upgrades.". Can someone point me to the SECURED 2.3.x version? More importantly, if it does exist, might it be a good idea in the future to show a completed and secured install of the previous version when a new version comes out? Too many people seem to feel compelled to upgrade even if they don't need the features in the new version, just to be secure. I suspect many of them spend hours and hours tracking down plugins and fixing things on their blogs as a result of upgrades, when they likely would have been very content to stop at (example) 2.3.5 instead of jumping to 2.5.0.

    While it is nice that there is a secure version of 2.0.x, I think it would be a good idea to issue the security fixes at each step, so that people can get off the elevator at any floor SAFELY. There are way to many unsecured 2.2 and 2.3.x blogs out there, and we all risk google or yahoo taking action to negatively weigh blogs to avoid security risk sites.

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