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One install? Can MS connect several installs? (8 posts)

  1. thelaw
    Member
    Posted 2 years ago #

    This is a tricky question. I need to set up several wordpress areas on my site that should have one login. Let say I have four separate "sites" (e.g. /mag /wiki /shop / directory) all on one install. It seems that each area could result in a large database and if that went down, it would take everything down. The magazine itself grew to 400MB quickly. This leads me to believe that multisite in one database is not a good idea. So I was looking at this:

    http://codex.wordpress.org/Installing_Multiple_Blogs

    The ability to have several different networks/installs on the same domain sharing one user database and meta data. I'm hoping to have wiki.mysite.com and shop.mysite.com - in separate databases - all using one user table and meta data.

    (1) Do I need to have separate installs on every subdomain? (I believe the answer is yes.)

    (2) Are there instructions on how to set this up?

  2. (1) Noooooo. You can use Multisite.

    (2) Of course! http://codex.wordpress.org/Create_A_Network

  3. thelaw
    Member
    Posted 2 years ago #

    Ipstenu - Thanks, I read this - but I don't think it covers what I'm talking about. I'm not talking about 10 subdomain installs in one WP database. The database could easily grow to 5GB if that was the case. I'm talking about WordPress in 10 subdomains each with their own database sharing one set of user accounts and metadata.

    The way I see MultiSite is that it's just like MU. Right now I have it set up on domain A which allows me to have multiple blogs in subdirectories, each with their own set of plugins, etc. Easy to install and setup. The same can be done in a subdomain. Multiple subdomains sharing one database although there is additional complication - each subdomain must be "mapped" with its own DNS as if it was another domain. At least that is what I understand so far. You either have a network of subdirectories or network of subdomains all in one database.

    What am I missing here in the codex?

  4. I suppose my question would more be 'What are you missing that you think multiple databaes that use ONE set of user accounts is better (or worse) than ONE database with multiple tables?'

    We're hitting the same end, just via different directions. Multisite is what MU grew up into, so it's the same thing. And yes, your DB could grow into 5G, but first that'll take a while (with 10 subdomains, quite a while) and second we already have tools to help you (see http://wordpress.org/extend/plugins/shardb/ )

    If you want ONE login for X number of sites, then Multisite's the more efficient way to go.

  5. thelaw
    Member
    Posted 2 years ago #

    Ipstenu - Good questions.

    One database with multiple tables might work fine provided that I can separate those tables into separate files. (a) Multiple storage files reduces the number of points of total failure, e.g. if the directory goes down at least the magazine and wiki are still up. (b) I already have a good amount of content that needs to be imported. Many of these shared subdomains will have content.

    How does shardb work? I'm nervous using such a tool as it seems to me to be the kind of tool that requires some serious system admin skills. I've been hosting sites for years, know enough to get around a bit in linux for basic tasks, can use YUM, but am not by any means a substitute for a real linux or db admin by a long shot.

    Yes, I want one login. Let's say we go your way and have to reinstall everything. I can remove most of the other subdirectory blogs without concern. I can export data out of 5 of them and reimport them (they are minor.) I have a couple of large subdomain installs that are all text and can be export/import in theory - no images. They are large sized (and used as wikis.) The exception is one big blog on a subdirectory which I guess will need to stay there given SEO. That can always be a standalone.

    What is your recommendation regarding propert setup for something of this nature? I haven't done subdomains and hopefully you've seen a good tutorial or other set of steps. Thank you for your insights.

  6. Any SEO fears you have are unfounded. SEO does not give a damn if you use one DB or twenty. Just ... toss that out. Seriously, they don't matter at all.

    And SharDB is a very reliable bit of software. I don't use it, I have yet to need it, but it's written by one of the best Multisite brains out there :) I would trust his stuff without question (and I never let anyone use my car, I'm not trusting at all). Check out http://wpmututorials.com/plugins/shardb/

    One database with multiple tables might work fine provided that I can separate those tables into separate files.

    Which is ... 100% exactly what MultiSite does. wp_x_<tablename> -- There are shared tables. wp_users, wp_usermeta, and some wp_blogs stuff to manage the separate sites. But the content is 100% segregated. And SharDB moves some of those tables into different files :)

    Multiple storage files reduces the number of points of total failure, e.g. if the directory goes down at least the magazine and wiki are still up

    That ... is really hard to math out. Given that WordPress.com is running Multisite, I'm less worried about it than I might be. I've had very few DB/table corruptions with WordPress in general (compared to some other software I run).

  7. thelaw
    Member
    Posted 2 years ago #

    Thanks for pointing me to the SharDB tutorial. Now I recognize the names - yes, pretty reliable folks. I think SharDB describes what I envisioned, the ability to segregate large blogs into separate DB files while sharing a user table (not sure how it works but well done.) Perhaps I'll just set it up properly the first time out.

    Agreed on the SEO - my concern was about changing to subdomains versus the subdirectory structure that I currently have for much of the site. Panda has been challenging. In general I think subdomains are certainly more challenging to setup and manage technically than subdomains, but: (i) despite being one website, you do get multiple individual listings in Google for each subdomain, and (ii) slightly shorter urls (three letters).

    I'll try to setup a subdomain with mapping on the weekend. I see Andrea and Ron also have their own tutorial books which might provide other worthwhile tips that you don't get online and plugins (they should have reviews.) I'll also try to find some others just to get the install done and best practices for setting up the unified site properly. Thanks for the help and any thoughts you can share on best practices for setup.

  8. my concern was about changing to subdomains versus the subdirectory structure that I currently have for much of the site.

    I went the other way recently (subdomains switched to subfolders) with no change to anything. I think it doesn't matter as much as we think it might ;) Google now treats Subdomains the same as Subfolders, though, except in cases of hosted sites (i.e. you.wordpress.com or you.livejournal.com)

    My school of thought on 'subdomains or subfolders' is stupid simple :)

    If I'm running the whole site, and every child site is 'connected' then I want subfolders. If the sites are meant to be un-related (or 'less' related), then I want subdomains.

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