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How to disable revisions (20 posts)

  1. thinlight
    Member
    Posted 5 years ago #

    Yeah I've seen several threads about this problem.

    I've added this line to my wp-config.php:

    define('WP_POST_REVISIONS', false);

    but wordpress still generated a revision.

    The record to display the post has post_date 2008-09-17 20:49:20, but the revision record's post_date is two seconds later, and its post_name is '500-autosave'.

    Anyone can help me? Thanks.

  2. Samuel Wood (Otto)
    Tech Ninja
    Posted 5 years ago #

    Disabling revisions does not also disable autosaving.

    Use these plugins to disable revisions or autosave:
    http://exper.3drecursions.com/2008/07/25/disable-revisions-and-autosave-plugin/

    I still can't understand why anybody would want to disable them though. It makes absolutely no sense. People really need to get over the idea of deleting things. Space is cheap. I mean, you don't delete your old emails do you? What happens when you need them later?

  3. Dgold
    Member
    Posted 5 years ago #

    The main reason I've disabled post revisions on a couple blogs is this feature seems to conflict with some common uses of Custom Fields, at least when writing your custom fields via some popular plugins. In the forums here, there are numerous threads of people whose custom fields implementations were borked by WP 2.6 and the problem was fixed by disabling Post Revisions. Yes, of course, some of these problems have to do with Plugins that we use to handle our custom fields, and yes I understand the plugin should be fixed, but in the meantime people can't really live with a broken website while we wait for plugins to become compatible with Post Revisions. While it may be a great feature, it's a feature that "I never knew I wanted" so I'll certainly live without post revisions rather than live without the essential custom fields features, which my site is built on.

    I don't feel like I understand enough details to post about this as a bug on Trac myself (have never done that before, myself, as of yet, it seems techy but maybe I should try it). Maybe it's not even a WP bug, but rather a plugin compatibility issue. We can blame the plugin, but I need the plugins and I don't exactly NEED Post Revisions.

    Additionally -- on my other blog, where I left Post Revisions enabled and checked it out, it was attributing the Edits to the wrong author names anyway. I (the Admin) would edit posts, and the Revisions box in Write Post would still say "Authorname edited" instead of "Admin edited". When I actually know that Authorname hasn't been on my blog in months. That issue also made it come across as an unfinished feature on first look (2.6).

  4. Samuel Wood (Otto)
    Tech Ninja
    Posted 5 years ago #

    Maybe it's not even a WP bug, but rather a plugin compatibility issue.

    It is absolutely a plugin compatibility issue. When a revision is saved, the revision has a different post ID than the actual post does, so your custom fields plugin is incorrectly using that revision's ID instead of the actual post ID of the real post. It's the same issue that broke podPress, and it's generally fixed by adding a couple more lines of code to the plugin.

    And here's the thing: You should not be "waiting" for a plugin to get fixed. You should be looking for an alternative plugin that is actively maintained. Using old plugins that are not forward compatible and which are no longer maintained properly is an eventual recipe for disaster. If a piece of software is critical to your business or setup, then it is critically important that that software is active and alive. You don't use dead code for critical functions.

    Additionally -- on my other blog, where I left Post Revisions enabled and checked it out, it was attributing the Edits to the wrong author names anyway.

    That was fixed two months ago, and released in 2.6.1: http://trac.wordpress.org/ticket/7317

  5. Dgold
    Member
    Posted 5 years ago #

    I have tried & tested all the plugins I could find that deal with the same subject matter, in 2 differing custom fields environments (2 differing uses of custom fields). The alternatives had more bugs and less features than my plugins-of-choice + Post Revisions disabled.

    I disabled a minor feature of WP in order to save important features of the way my websites operate, and still be able to keep my WP upgraded. To me that's the right choice for running my websites.

    I think WP is about Open Source and flexibility. Anyone is free to use, or disable, whatever aspects of it they want. I don't view it as a problem if some people want to turn off post revisions.

  6. jcv
    Member
    Posted 5 years ago #

    I still can't understand why anybody would want to disable them though. It makes absolutely no sense. People really need to get over the idea of deleting things. Space is cheap. I mean, you don't delete your old emails do you? What happens when you need them later?

    Well, some hosts charge the DB size. Other have issues when DB becomes huge.

    Having SQL DB growing so much could be a serious problem for many of us...

  7. Samuel Wood (Otto)
    Tech Ninja
    Posted 5 years ago #

    Well, some hosts charge the DB size. Other have issues when DB becomes huge.
    Having SQL DB growing so much could be a serious problem for many of us...

    This one just seems like a theoretical argument to me. I mean, how much growth are we really talking here? If you include pictures on your site at all, the the size of the pictures dwarfs the size of the text by a factor of 10-20 or more. Tripling your DB size still wouldn't make a dent.

  8. jcv
    Member
    Posted 5 years ago #

    Im my case, I deactivated revision option because my DB (well, only wp-posts) did grow from 1.5 Mo to more than 6.

    Actually, I regularly edit my posts on my blog, which are pretty long. Even though pictures are managed by plugins, the db, in less than one month, expanded 4 times.

    IMHO, it depends of your personal usage. Not everyone needs to keep a revision (sorry, but I really don't see the point if you're the only writer), and for some people as me, it's a pain. For some other people (including you?), it a great tool, I can understand.

    However, such option should be deactivated *by default*. Most of users hold their blog being the only writer, thus they don't need revisions...

  9. Dgold
    Member
    Posted 5 years ago #

    On 1 of my blogs -- the posts are "live blogging" reporting on an event before, during (event in progress), and after the event. The post gets posted as an Announcement at 10 o'clock in the morning. Throughout the day, that same post is edited (anywhere from 12 to 200 times). Readers are continually checking to see the updates in that post, especially during the event hours. Finally around Midnight, I will complete the post and save the final revision, including adding audio-video recordings (podcast).

    Each post is an update on the previous version. It grows larger each time. I've never needed to go back to an old version in 3 years of doing this using WP.

    For me, having the ability to continue posting the way I always have, with the custom fields utility & podcasting readiness, is important to me. Having a record of 50 or more edits is not important for me, in comparison (if at all).

  10. Samuel Wood (Otto)
    Tech Ninja
    Posted 5 years ago #

    @psykonevro: I regularly work with terabyte sized databases. 6 meg DBs don't phase me. My own personal blog is in the 200+ megabyte range, with a database of around 20 megs or so. I wouldn't even expect noticeable scaling issues with mySQL until you get a database over 200 megs.

    And yes, I realize that some people don't use revisions and probably never will. But I disagree that that is "most" people, and I disagree that it should be disabled by default. There is no logical reason to disable it when it has no impact on the system. The benefits of it, even for rare uses, outweigh the costs. Admittedly, there are extreme edge cases where it could be a problem, but I'd be hard pressed to think of a realistic one.

    @Dgold: You know, you can set it to only keep a limited number of revisions, so that you don't get 50 or more edits saved, if that's the style of your bloggers (to edit a lot).

    Just add this to your wp-config.php file:
    define ('WP_POST_REVISIONS',5); // only keep last 5 revisions

  11. Dgold
    Member
    Posted 5 years ago #

    Thanks for that tip on keeping only-some post revisions. If I should ever choose to stop using
    define('WP_POST_REVISIONS', false); // disables post revisions

    then I would probably try
    define ('WP_POST_REVISIONS',5); // only keep last 5 revisions

    Or if WP 2.7+ adds post revision options settings in the Admin interface, that would be even better for most users. :)

  12. jcv
    Member
    Posted 5 years ago #

    Otto,

    Here is a French host which charge (a lot) more as soon as a DB is larger than 5 Mo: https://www.ovh.com/fr/particulier/produits/start1g.xml (sorry, it's in... French). This is the largest website provider in France, and since I didn't ever ask for hosting outside France and Switzerland, I can't know if this economical model is widely spread. It is actually spread among french speaking people, at least.

    Anyway, I understand I will not convince you. In my point of view, you only add a function when it is useful to majority of users (activated by default) some of users (unactivated, but implemented); in yours, if a function is not useful, who cares ? it is functional, it doesn't harm the system, let it be.

    Two incompatible approaches we won't reconcile here. Although I disagree, I understand your opinion.

  13. Samuel Wood (Otto)
    Tech Ninja
    Posted 5 years ago #

    Is Mo French for MB?

    Anyway, no, such a policy is not particularly widespread. All of the hosts I have ever used charge a rate for a given amount of flat space which is shared between your DB and your websites files. Most of them have some limitation on the total number of databases, but that's it.

    Frankly, I'd look for a different web host. This is the internet, you don't need a "local" host. Try asmallorange.com. They have good rates and easy setup, and I've heard good things about them.

    Also, I think that revisions ARE useful to the majority of users. That seems to be where you disagree. But remember that you are not the majority, and drawing conclusions based on only your own experience is not usually a good idea. I know a lot of bloggers and I've set up a lot of websites. Without exception, all of them have a real need for the revisions functionality, and such a feature was highly desired by a large number of people. Sure, my evidence is anecdotal too, but it's still significant.

  14. jcv
    Member
    Posted 5 years ago #

    Is Mo French for MB?

    Exactly, it stands for "Méga Octet".

    Anyway, no, such a policy is not particularly widespread. All of the hosts I have ever used charge a rate for a given amount of flat space which is shared between your DB and your websites files. Most of them have some limitation on the total number of databases, but that's it.

    Frankly, I'd look for a different web host. This is the internet, you don't need a "local" host. Try asmallorange.com. They have good rates and easy setup, and I've heard good things about them.

    I have to give a try. Don't know I'm still stuck with french webhosts, since I'm not French myself. Thanks for the tip.

    Also, I think that revisions ARE useful to the majority of users. That seems to be where you disagree. But remember that you are not the majority, and drawing conclusions based on only your own experience is not usually a good idea. I know a lot of bloggers and I've set up a lot of websites. Without exception, all of them have a real need for the revisions functionality, and such a feature was highly desired by a large number of people. Sure, my evidence is anecdotal too, but it's still significant.

    Well, if we don't get a wordpress sociologist who will give us clear statisticals, we've reach a dead-end :)

  15. giggity
    Member
    Posted 5 years ago #

    Putting aside the off-topic discussion regarding the value of Autosave and Revision features in WordPress, and continuing on with the author's original question - that is how to disable these features?

    I had great success with the WordPress Post Control Plugin, and would recommend it as a preferred method of disabled these features, rather than modifying any of the WP code directly.

  16. ggsmith
    Member
    Posted 5 years ago #

    what is needed, is to do regular backups, not making redundant copies.
    it appears that adding 2 lines to the wp-config.php file can work.
    setting the autosave interval to 0 does not turn it off - it goes 'bonkers'
    but, of course setting it to 100 minutes (6000 sec.) or whatever will do. set it to 200 (12000) if you wish.

    define('AUTOSAVE_INTERVAL', 6000 );
    define('WP_POST_REVISIONS', 0 );

    setting wp post revisions to zero does work. or at least, it did for me.
    if not, it can be changed from true to false in the wp-settings.php file down around line 495 (in ver2.7.1) and, that works. in any case, keep a record of your changes so you can re-implement them with the next upgrade(s)

  17. Shane G
    Member
    Posted 5 years ago #

    Hi,

    Add this code in wp-config.php file in order to disable revisions:

    define(’WP_POST_REVISIONS’, false);

    Thanks,

    Shane G.

  18. Exper
    Member
    Posted 5 years ago #

  19. esmi
    Forum Moderator
    Posted 5 years ago #

    No problems thus far with 2.8 and the Revision Control plugin:

    http://dd32.id.au/wordpress-plugins/revision-control/

    Unlike the previous plugin it offers a 3rd option - limit the number of revisions on both a site wide and post-by-post basis.

  20. dotnetchic
    Member
    Posted 4 years ago #

    Maybe it's not even a WP bug, but rather a plugin compatibility issue.

    It is absolutely a plugin compatibility issue. When a revision is saved, the revision has a different post ID than the actual post does, so your custom fields plugin is incorrectly using that revision's ID instead of the actual post ID of the real post. It's the same issue that broke podPress, and it's generally fixed by adding a couple more lines of code to the plugin.

    Otto, I am developing a plugin, and have run into this issue, just found this info...

    What code would I need to add to reference the actual post # instead of the revision #?

    many thanks,

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