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High Server Load: W3 Total Cache or WP Super Cache ? (35 posts)

  1. salva_nio
    Member
    Posted 3 years ago #

    Hi,
    My site often have a peaks of 10/12000 unique visitors and when it happens, my hosting (Hostgator) block my wp site for an high server load.

    I have now installed :
    WP Super Cache
    DB Cache Reloaded
    SQL Monitor

    But Hostgator when i have up to 10.000 unique visitors, block my site for high server load.

    W3 Total Cache, is better than WP Super Cache,DB Cache Reloaded and SQL Monitor for my WP 2.9.2 ?

    Some advice ?
    Thanks!

  2. Donncha O Caoimh
    Member
    Posted 3 years ago #

    You possibly need a faster server if Supercache is installed properly. Did they say in what time period you had 10,000 unique visitors?

  3. salva_nio
    Member
    Posted 3 years ago #

    unfortunately no..
    when the anime is on TV, There is more interest in my site, and i've 10/12.000 unique visitors.
    But I think that I'm NOT the only one that having these visitors on wordpress site.
    nobody else has had my problem?

  4. Donncha O Caoimh
    Member
    Posted 3 years ago #

    You can be sure that other people have these problems. If this is shared hosting it probably isn't powerful enough for that level of traffic.

    You could try "lockdown" mode in Supercache or "directly cache" particular pages. Also disable any plugins you don't absolutely need.

  5. riledhel
    Member
    Posted 3 years ago #

    As donncha says, also consider moving your site from a shared hosting account to a VPS. Otherwise you will continue having your site blocked or you may have you account canceled.
    Installing cache plugins isn't enough when you start having 10k+ visitors.

  6. Klark0
    Member
    Posted 3 years ago #

    Upgrade your hosting.

    I get 30k uniques per day and now am running great with a small dedicated.
    Here's some tips:

    -Use Disqus or intense debate for comments. this is useful if you get alot of comments. No wordpress comments = no comment cookies = no cache refresh on comment submit.

    -If you use related posts, use a service like Surphace.

    -If you have lots of posts, convert your DB to InnoDB.

    -Use W3 Total cache and configure all four options. Use the poor man's CDN with a subdomain.

  7. salva_nio
    Member
    Posted 3 years ago #

    thanks for the advice but a small dedicated is too expensive form me..
    wich host do you have? Hostgator?
    Now.. i've the site in down : http://www.onepieceworld.net/
    And I have now installed :
    WP Super Cache
    DB Cache Reloaded
    SQL Monitor

    I try to disable these plugin and activate W3 TOTAL CACHE ?

  8. Arpit
    Member
    Posted 3 years ago #

    I would suggest you to use wp-minify plugin. One of the best. I'm using it with WP Super Cache and noticed best performance.

    Link: http://wordpress.org/extend/plugins/wp-minify/

  9. salva_nio
    Member
    Posted 3 years ago #

    thank a lot arpitshah!
    Now i try with this plugin!
    I tell you if everything works ok in a few days! Thanks! :)

  10. webjunk
    Member
    Posted 3 years ago #

    I use Hostgator for a lot of my clients. Their shared servers are pretty beefy. They don't disable your site for visitors but maybe CPU? In which case what you should be doing is SSH into your server and run top. You may find a specific process causing your problem and not your site in general.
    But I do agree that you probably belong on a dedicated server.

  11. Frederick Townes
    Member
    Posted 3 years ago #

    W3 Total Cache supports all of the popular hosting account types, but there are lots of plugins, themes, widgets and hosts out there. So if you want some tips you can contact me through my site or if you install W3TC use the bug submission form.

  12. cfisher
    Member
    Posted 3 years ago #

    @salva_nio

    I noticed that you use WP Super Cache and DB Cache Reloaded together. I have seen a number of sites state that they are compatible. I was about to create a new thread to ask this, but I thought I try here first.

    Have you found these two plugins to be compatible? Do they create speed gains when used together?

    Thanks

  13. Donncha O Caoimh
    Member
    Posted 3 years ago #

    cfisher - you can use db cache reloaded just fine with wp-super-cache. I used it for a while but didn't notice any difference in server load.

  14. cfisher
    Member
    Posted 3 years ago #

    Thanks so much for the quick response.

    Just to clarify, you didn't notice a difference in server load, but did you notice any increase in web page speed?

  15. Donncha O Caoimh
    Member
    Posted 3 years ago #

    Nope, everything is preloaded so it's all served by mod_rewrite rules without hitting the database or PHP at all! Load on the server is negligible.

  16. manhal99
    Member
    Posted 3 years ago #

    Hi cfisher
    I don't have knowledge with wordpress but notice something in your site
    You use i lot pictures as background in your home page you lose about 300 KB for this backgrounds.
    If you fix that with small size pictures i think you well save about 30% of bandwidth
    Sorry for my bad English

  17. cfisher
    Member
    Posted 3 years ago #

    @donncha - thanks for the clarification. BTW, I eagerly await your integration of that Minifiy plugin designed for SuperCache (I saw this discussed on the author's website). I have problems with the other main WP-Minify plugin, and I hope this one works for me!

    @manhal99 - thanks for the advice. I've been working hard to increase my website speed with only marginal returns. I'l like to implement WP Smush.it plugin to address your concerns over image size, but I am uncertain if this plugin plays nicely SuperCache with the CDN enabled.

    Chris

  18. cfisher
    Member
    Posted 3 years ago #

    @donncha - have you tested SuperCache with CDN enabled along side WP Smush.it plugin? I am trying to wrap my head around how these might integrate together.

    Thanks!
    Chris

  19. Donncha O Caoimh
    Member
    Posted 3 years ago #

    I haven't ever used Smush.it. I wouldn't go compressing the files on my server anyway because I upload them at the quality setting I want.

    You might want to look at the CDN Sync Tool which does support smush.it and will upload the files to your CDN too, apparently. I haven't used it.

  20. cadbloke
    Member
    Posted 3 years ago #

    The best tool I've found for compressing image sizes is RIOT at http://luci.criosweb.ro/riot/ It is also an Irfanview plugin. Both versions are free.

    I compress things like screengrabs to 256 color PNGs with RIOT - it saves a lot of bytes for a barely noticeable difference.

    Don't let the PHP server compress them - it is far-less sophisticated than a good image editor

  21. cfisher
    Member
    Posted 3 years ago #

    Thanks Donncha. I'll have a look at that.

    @Cadbloke - thanks I'll check that out.

  22. Hubert Nguyen
    Member
    Posted 3 years ago #

    For shared hosting, WP SuperCache + CDN is probably the best option. If you can tweak your server settings and install APC or MemCached, W3TC might work better for highly dynamic content.

  23. nv1962
    Member
    Posted 3 years ago #

    +1 on WP SuperCache and CDN for shared hosting enviros.

    By the way, I think both WP Super Cache and W3 Total Cache are incredible and excellent, so I have no bias whatsoever against either - it's just that presently, again: for shared hosting situations, WP Super Cache together with the self-hosted CDN option (make sure you also use extra subdomains in the "Additional CNAMES" field, like cdn1.example.com, cdn2.example.com, cdn3.example.com) is a solution that can stretch your traffic a long ways and is slightly easier to get and keep working.

    In addition to the earlier great suggestion to also use the WP Minify plugin (i.e. together with WP Super Cache) also look into the oft overlooked WP Widget Cache plugin: as the name suggests, it is very helpful if you have widgets in your sidebars, and you can activate and tweak caching duration on a per-widget basis, and best of all, it works like a charm with WP Super Cache.

    Finally, a tip which steps outside the realm of caching and instead looks at the volume of traffic itself, i.e. a wholly different approach: look into the (free) CloudFlare service. That is a reverse proxy type filter based bad bot blocking service, which essentially cleans up the traffic by eliminating most of the bad stuff. Oddly enough, that service works better with W3 Total Cache! If you go with the free service mode, the CDN issue becomes practically moot, as CloudFlare already does a lot of caching transparently for you. Again, that's a different approach, but it may be just right for you.

    It'd be neat of WP Super Cache also supports CloudFlare, then again: it's tried and tested to work very well with W3 Total Cache already.

  24. cfisher
    Member
    Posted 3 years ago #

    Thanks nv1962 for this write up. I reviewed the CloudFlare service. That appears to be a very interesting approach to speeding up a website.

    @donncha - any idea if/how CloudFlare might work with SuperCache? I also use a 3rd party CDN and set up it up directly into SuperCache. In addition to filtered DNS, CloudFlare says that they also cache images, CSS, javascript, etc. too so they sound like a CDN in some respects... All this caching by various parties (SuperCache, CDN, Cloudflare) makes my head hurt trying to wrap my mind around the caching of a cache of a cache.

  25. nv1962
    Member
    Posted 3 years ago #

    Yeah it can get complicated very quickly! Just to be sure: don't mix the use of self-hosted CDNs in WP Super Cache together with CloudFlare if you're going with their generous Free service. Their paid Pro service can handle CDNs with more flexibility, but I suppose most will want to look into their Free service first. BTW: CloudFlare picks up static files (images, JS, CSS) automatically, to serve those from its farm, so that amply compensates the "lack" of self-hosted CDNs. Also: when minifying javascript and CSS files (either with a separate plugin or inside W3 Total Cache) be careful to not minify already minified files (if the JS or CSS code already looks like a solid block of text, it's minified already - some plugin developers do that to speed up performance.) And finally, some JS simply doesn't like being minified and/or concatenated. In my experience, it's best to do things step by step: get the cache working first, then add minify, then work with CDNs to see if that works, too.

  26. Donncha O Caoimh
    Member
    Posted 3 years ago #

    I used cloudflare to CDN one of my sites, including html pages and it worked fine with Supercache. Cloudflare just requested the (already preloaded) pages and then continued to serve them AFAIR.

  27. Frederick Townes
    Member
    Posted 3 years ago #

    It's important to understand that CloudFlare is *not* a CDN, nor is it their intension to be. Furthermore nothing replaces properly tuning your web site before adding other services as next or final steps.

  28. cfisher
    Member
    Posted 3 years ago #

    I found an interesting article where a guy benchmarked SuperCache and CloudFlare in various combinations. There were plus and minuses to using both SuperCache and Cloudflare. The article is here.

  29. nv1962
    Member
    Posted 3 years ago #

    Interesting that, cfisher, but Mr Ivan Malijkh jumps straight past Frederick Townes' important reminder:

    CloudFlare is *not* a CDN, nor is it their intension to be.

    (My emphasis)

    After all, CloudFlare has a security focus. The approximate CDN functionality is a nice extra thrown in, arguably (perhaps) to offset the tiny extra time for originating IP lookups. But their focus is on internet hygiene, not performance optimization per se.

    Nonetheless... It's still an interesting article, as it shows that picking the appropriate distributed content delivery method and provider does benefit from selecting one that is within geographic proximity. I.e. as Ivan Malijkh already notes, he has sites served from the Netherlands, and when the users (visitors) are also in the Netherlands, the obvious CDN choice would be in that same country, too. That explains why his setup with CloudFlare fared not so well; it's not so much about CoudFlare's service but the Netherlands not being in Kansas anymore, Toto.

    Again, Frederick Townes' reminder is important to keep in mind (if you forgive me the department of redundancy department)

  30. Frederick Townes
    Member
    Posted 3 years ago #

    @nv1962, no apology necessary, taking the time to be extra clear is a luxury I wish I had more of. Well done.

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