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Help with Design (4 posts)

  1. Yannick Lefebvre
    Member
    Posted 10 years ago #

    I have migrated my site from Blogger to WordPress yesterday. I have managed to get almost everything working. The only problem I have left is when I have more than one post on the same day.
    I have added the post category in front of the post title and therefore had to make the UL and LI items to be inline:
    .h2title ul {
    display: inline;
    margin: 0;
    padding: 0;
    list-style: none;
    }
    .h2title li {
    display: inline;
    MARGIN-LEFT: 10px;
    }
    When I have more than one entry, there is only one return after the end of each entry. I would to see two returns so that there would be a blank line between each item. Here is a link to my Weblog so you can see what I mean:
    http://nayana.urlq.net/index.php?m=20030123
    If you have any idea on how I can correct this, I would be glad to hear them. The CSS is at the top of the HTML page.
    Thanks in advance.

  2. carthik
    Member
    Posted 10 years ago #

    You have a "post" div class. You could add
    padding-bottom : how-many-ever-pixels-you-need-at-the-bottom;
    To augment the spaces between posts.

  3. Yannick Lefebvre
    Member
    Posted 10 years ago #

    True, that does the trick. Not the next thing I have to figure out is why things are so spaced out in IE and not in Mozilla Firefox. I much prefer the way things are coming out in Firefox for the spacing. Darn browsers.

  4. Anonymous
    Unregistered
    Posted 10 years ago #

    Put simply: Some versions of IE miscalculate the width by adding padding, margins, and borders. A degree of lateral thinking is required if a box needs both width and margins eg when using float. You either need Tantek's voicebox hack, or to nest the div with the margin inside another div for the width, avoiding both together. Some guys just try and avoid the situation altogether. The default WP layout is very cleverly put together in this respect. But if we fiddle with it (and who doesn't?) it does require a degree of understanding of legacy browser compliance and css. A lot of fun. At the outset though we can make a choice. We could just validate to say css 2 and let the viewers do the worrying.
    It might spoil their experiences. But it might encourage more people to download better browsers.

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