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[resolved] Appearance inconsistencies??? (3 posts)

  1. jmjf
    Member
    Posted 1 year ago #

    I'm having trouble understanding what seem to be site design, layout or appearance inconsistencies in the-bootstrap. I'm hoping someone can help me understand if there are reasons for these or if this is something that should be changed.

    If a site has a custom home page, it has a separate blog page. Pages typically have a title at the top identifying the page. Many people remove the title from the home page (understandably), but on a site with a home page, the blog is just another page of content. In this scenario, the blog page's appearance is inconsistent with the rest of the site if it doesn't have a title.

    Am I missing some reason why a blog page on a site with a home page wouldn't have a "Blog" title? (Or perhaps the title of the blog page, whatever that is. It doesn't have to be "Blog.")

    Assuming the blog page has a title, entry listings on the blog page (generated from partials/content.php) should not have h1-size titles because they'll be under the h1-size page title for the blog. Arguably, the blog page should be able to show excerpts only instead of full posts on a home page based site (should be an option somewhere). It seems excerpts would be easier than full entries for small-screen users (scrolling)--and for large-screen users who can figure out if they want to read an entry based on the title and a few lines. (But some might want the full entry so they can search in the page for specific text, so this should be an option for the site owner to choose.)

    Is there a way to detect that a site is running with a home page instead of using the blog (index.php) as home so index.php can be smart about which approach it uses (whether it titles the blog page, whether it uses excerpts, etc.)? Maybe by inspecting some of the theme parameters. Maybe some new theme parameters.

    I'm also wondering why, on a blog page listing, formatted posts (asides, quotes, etc.) should say "Aside," "Quote," etc. after the title and before the content and should have the meta after the entry content instead of before it when single posts display the meta immediately after the title. (See line 27 of partials/content.php which says only posts show meta before the entry content. The individual format-specific files display the format name.) The existing approach results in inconsistent appearance because content.php is designed to show a list of posts on a page together while content-aside.php, etc. are designed to show a single post on a page by itself.

    Is there a reason why this inconsistency is desirable?

    The format information only shows up on the blog list, not on the page for the post itself (which I'm guessing calls partials/content-single.php because all posts seem to be formatted the same in a single view). I can imagine that at least some of the formats might display their content with specialized styling on both the list and the single-entry page. For example, a quote format might use the blockquote tag. Aside might use a pull-right and larger font-size, maybe italics or something. (Thinking about how asides appear in print. Why bother with an "aside" or "quote" post if it's going to look the same as any other?)

    Basically, I'm exploring the design considerations here and want to make sure I haven't missed something. I can see that this might just be a theme maturity issue (the-bootstrap is only a year old and has come a long way in that year, but still has room to improve). I'm willing to make at least some of the modifications and post them on git if people agree with points above.

  2. If a site has a custom home page, it has a separate blog page. Pages typically have a title at the top identifying the page. Many people remove the title from the home page (understandably), but on a site with a home page, the blog is just another page of content. In this scenario, the blog page's appearance is inconsistent with the rest of the site if it doesn't have a title.

    Did you try to reproduce that with a different theme? I'm pretty sure that is standard WordPress behavior. AFAIK, there is nothing controlled by the theme that explicitly prevents the page title from displaying when set as the blog page.

    I'm also wondering why, on a blog page listing, formatted posts (asides, quotes, etc.) should say "Aside," "Quote," etc. after the title and before the content and should have the meta after the entry content instead of before it when single posts display the meta immediately after the title. [...] The existing approach results in inconsistent appearance [...]

    This is intended as such. From the Codex: <q>A Post Format is a piece of meta information that can be used by a theme to customize its presentation of a post.</q>

    The different ways of displaying the various supported post formats is supposed to mixup the timeline a little. If you're not too fond of it, feel free to remove post format support in a child theme.

    The format information only shows up on the blog list, not on the page for the post itself [...]. I can imagine that at least some of the formats might display their content with specialized styling on both the list and the single-entry page.

    Yes, this will probably be changed in the future to be consistent across index/single views.

    Thank you for all your help around here, by the way! Make sure to let me know when we cross paths at a WordCamp or so, so I can show my gratitude!

  3. jmjf
    Member
    Posted 1 year ago #

    Thanks for the feedback. I checked out the blog page title in 2011 and it was as you say, so that design inconsistency is WP's fault. :) Meanwhile, I've customized my child theme to force a title on index.php.

    I did some reading on post formats. On the one hand, I think what the WP guys are trying to do is good, but I'm uncertain how well it will work out. My opinion is that typography and design should hide behind content. Multiple formats on a single page makes the design visible. My solution was to keep the post's outer structure consistent (because none of that is the post proper) and include the post format in the meta line to differentiate them. Content should make the different types obvious. At least, that's what I believe. :)

    I'm also kind of ambivalent to post formats because I wasn't able to replace my custom post type (the primary use case for the site I'm building) with a taxonomy. Several articles suggested this would work, but I couldn't get the formatting control I want to replace the custom post type. But that's my problem. :)

    Yes, this will probably be changed in the future to be consistent across index/single views.

    Did that on my child. I'll give you a pull on github when I get a chance (sometime in the next few days).

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