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Anyone using Multilingual-plugin? (9 posts)

  1. roterhund
    Member
    Posted 8 years ago #

    Hi, I've downloaded and installed the multilingual plugin recently, and I can write multiple language versions of posts in the admin panel, but I don't see any effect on the actual blog yet. Now I know the plugin is alpha and not fully functional yet, but I thought maybe someone more PHP-savvy than myself might have experimented successfully with it.

    I've also tried polyglot with some success, but it looks like what Morgan and Chris are trying to achieve will be much more complete and comfortable to use. Unfortunately, there haven't been any updates on Morgan's page lately. I really hope they're still working on it.

    Any insights or other ideas for multilingual (i.e.: the whole page in two or more languages, posts and navigation) blogging highly appreciated!

  2. jwurster
    Member
    Posted 8 years ago #

    I use this http://blog.taragana.com/index.php/archive/wordpress-plugin-automatic-machine-translation-for-your-blog-in-eight-languages-spanish-french-german-portuguese-italian-japanese-korean-and-chinese/

    I haven't tried "multilingual" yet. The translator plugin I use just translates your blog using Google's resources.

  3. roterhund
    Member
    Posted 8 years ago #

    Hehe, yes, I've seen that before. It's a good laugh, but I prefer to personally write the translated versions as well. Thanks anyway!

  4. jwurster
    Member
    Posted 8 years ago #

    Since I don't write in any other language, I thought this could be beneficial to someone who doesn't read English but would like to read my blog in their native language. I know the plugin has its shortcomings, but it would seem to me to be better than nothing. Maybe polyglot would be better until multilingual is done.

  5. roterhund
    Member
    Posted 8 years ago #

    I don't know if you know more than one language but anyone who does will probably chuckle at the results of machine translations. The problem is that machines don't know how to *interprete* phrases (well, they don't even agree on how to interprete code ;-) .

    By the way, taranaga might be surprised to hear that there are good reasons not to use flags as representation of languages.

    Guess I'll give polyglot another try for the time being.

  6. jwurster
    Member
    Posted 8 years ago #

    I agree with you. I also checked out why flags are not good. Makes a lot of sense. Maybe I don't want this at all on my blog. I'll do more reading about polyglot.

    Maybe I'll spend more time getting my blog to be more usable by individuals who are disabled and people with special needs.

  7. roterhund
    Member
    Posted 8 years ago #

    Polyglot is a good start, I guess, but the handling is a bit »rough«. There are a few things I would change if only I knew more PHP (I'm learning quickly though):
    - when you click a language-link on the blog, it changes the language and takes you to the home page. That's really confusing. You should stay on the same page. (This one I almost managed to half fix, sort of … )
    - if the client (browser) doesn't support one of the languages supported (»known«) by the blog, no text is displayed instead of text in the default language.
    - you have to manually put the language-tags when posting.

    { BTW: No offense, Fred, I know writing a plugin must be a lot of work, and on your website you say that polyglot is a bit demanding handling-wise. I'm just thinking aloud. }

    Multilingual will be exactly what I dreamed of if the team accomplish what they set out to do. Unfortunately, there doesn't seem to be much demand for multilingual blogging (I mean: jwurster, you were so kind as to respond to my post, but multilingual blogging isn't a major concern for you either, is it?) and, as I said, there hasn't been much activity on the multilingual page lately, so I'm a bit worried. Maybe my greatest problem is my impatience, though ;-)

    One example of the flag-problem: I'm german, living in Barcelona, Spain. If I put a german flag to represent german, austrians, some swiss, and maybe even people from Liechtenstein or Belgium might be offended (somebody will probably be offended right now because I forget to mention his german-speaking minority in some country … so here's my pre-emptive apologies). If I put a spanish flag to represent spanish, the confusion is even bigger, because not only do people from other countries than Spain speak spanish, but in Spain there are also four major official languages. Right here in Barcelona people speak Catalan, for instance. Actually, people here in Catalonia don't even referr to spanish as »spanish« (or español), but as »Castellano«. That was a huge aside, sorry ;-)

  8. jalenack
    Member
    Posted 8 years ago #

    Don't mind if I bud in :) ... For problem #1 where it takes you back to the homepage, that should easily be fixed by changed the redirect to take you to $_SERVER['REQUEST_URI'] .. which is basically a link back to where you were.

  9. roterhund
    Member
    Posted 8 years ago #

    Hi jalenack, please do bud in ;-)

    $_SERVER['REQUEST_URI'] is exactly what I was experimenting with. Strangely, when I use that, I stay on the same page, but the language doesn't change. That's why I said it was only half fixed, sort of.

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