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Twenty Twelve
2012 completely breaks in browsers without media query support (10 posts)

  1. Dan Rossiter
    Member
    Posted 1 year ago #

    Using Firefox 3.0.18 in an Ubuntu install breaks the theme. The theme ends up displaying as if it is on a mobile device, regardless of the browser dimensions.

    I understand this is a very old browser, but it would be nice if the theme had a decent fallback. I'm not asking for the same quality as the full theme, but defaulting to the mobile version makes the site look broken with a full size screen.

  2. Tomas Mackevicius
    Member
    Posted 1 year ago #

    Officially FireFox developer stopped support of this version back in 2010. Why other should support this old version?

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Firefox_3.5

  3. Dan Rossiter
    Member
    Posted 1 year ago #

    If web developers are still taking the effort to support the (god awful) IE6, then FF of any version, depreciated or not, should also be supported.

    I was accessing my theme through an academic environment where I do not have the permissions necessary to update the browser and I have no doubt there are others in the same position.

    Graceful degradation should be what the theme strives for. This is not graceful by any means.

  4. Andrew
    Forum Moderator
    Posted 1 year ago #

    I'd pay someone to develop for early browser versions. It's too much to ask from a free theme vendor.

  5. esmi
    Forum Moderator
    Posted 1 year ago #

    If web developers are still taking the effort to support the (god awful) IE6

    They're not. No one (who wants to retain both hair and sanity) supports IE6 these days. There are only about 4 "fixes" for IE6 in Twenty Twelve and they are there mainly to support screen reader users who may be forced to use older versions of IE6 due to the prohibitive cost of upgrading their software.

  6. Tomas Mackevicius
    Member
    Posted 1 year ago #

    Another point is that some FF versions (most likely 3.x too) were "rapid dev. cycle" versions with short support cycle. The are also extended support versions of FF, but you have to read more about them.

  7. mhutchin
    Member
    Posted 1 year ago #

    Firefox 3.0.18 has five critical security vulnerabilities, and one high level security vulnerability, that were fixed in 3.0.19 (30 March 2010)[1], plus all of the vulnerabilities, of various levels, that have been addressed since then that were already present in 3.0.18. As a professional web developer, I don't want to do something that would encourage people to run browsers with known security vulnerabilities when there are more secure versions of the same product available. I don't want to be a professional that encourages irresponsible behavior. If I were a physician, what kind of physician would I be if I encouraged drinking and driving?

    [1] Security Advisories for Firefox 3.0. (n.d.). Retrieved January 19, 2013, from https://www.mozilla.org/security/known-vulnerabilities/firefox30.html

  8. Dan Rossiter
    Member
    Posted 1 year ago #

    @Andrew: When its WordPress' own annual release, I hold the free theme to a slightly higher standard, even if it is free.

    @esmi: That's fair. But, when options like Enquire.js exist, can sacrificing the theme to that user base still using legacy browsers really be justified?

    @mhutchin: Trust me, I am in no way advocating the use of any old browsers, as all of them were retired for a good reason, including both security holes and lacking functionality. That said, in not taking the effort to support as many browsers as possible, the only person being hurt is your employer. The site looking bad in someone's old browser is not going to make them change browsers. If they've stuck with it that long, it will take significantly more for them to change. What it will do is make your employer look bad, which is never a good thing. My two cents, anyway.

    The reason this department in my university runs such an old version of FF is because the OS running on the machines, an older Ubuntu install, doesn't support the newer browsers. Though it is undoubtedly something that needs to be updated, it is not a simple resolution. In the academic and corporate world, issues such as this occur all the time. I believe that web developers need to do their best to support as much as they can and not presume that the person using an older browser can be coerced into upgrading, since they often don't have a choice in the matter or are simply too stubborn to have their mind changed.

  9. Just inserting my own 2 cents in this...

    If web developers are still taking the effort to support the (god awful) IE6

    Frankly, no serious developer is supporting IE6. Even stodgy conservative institutions have finally given that up broken browser.

    When its WordPress' own annual release, I hold the free theme to a slightly higher standard, even if it is free.

    ...

    That said, in not taking the effort to support as many browsers as possible, the only person being hurt is your employer. The site looking bad in someone's old browser is not going to make them change browsers.

    That's a contradictory pair of statements (that I've intentionally cherry picked).

    IE 6 and other older browsers were getting a pass because standards were intentionally kept low. Maintaining support for older browsers lowers the bars for everyone and just extends really poor practices. By not supporting older (outdated and should be put to bed) browsers WordPress is raising standards. That's a good thing. ;)

    The Twenty Twelve theme isn't doing anything radical and the current versions of the available browsers are available for use. Your initial problem could likely be solved by either a child theme with some modifications (as an example) or just use a different theme.

    I know that's not the point of you original post but extending and supporting standards is a good thing. Specific problems such as your's can be fixed in a specific case.

  10. mhutchin
    Member
    Posted 1 year ago #

    @Dan

    I've worked in academia as a software engineer for over thirty years, from small community colleges to major research universities, and I've worked in corporate. I stand by my comments.

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