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WordPress 3.5 Release Candidate 3

Posted December 4, 2012 by Andrew Nacin. Filed under Development, Testing.

The third release candidate for WordPress 3.5 is now available. We’ve made a number of changes over the last week since RC2 that we can’t wait to get into your hands. Hope you’re ready to do some testing!

  • Final UI improvements for the new media manager, based on lots of great feedback.
  • Show more information about uploading errors when they occur.
  • When inserting an image into a post, don’t forget the alternative text.
  • Fixes for the new admin button styles.
  • Improvements for mobile devices, Internet Explorer, and right-to-left languages.
  • Fix cookies for subdomain installs when multisite is installed in a subdirectory.
  • Fix ms-files.php rewriting for very old multisite installs.

At this point, we only have a few minor issues left. If all goes well, you will see WordPress 3.5 very soon. If you run into any issues, please post to the Alpha/Beta area in the support forums.

If you’d like to know what to test, visit the About page ( → About in the toolbar) and check out the list of features. This is still development software, so your boss may get mad if you install this on a live site. To test WordPress 3.5, try the WordPress Beta Tester plugin (you’ll want “bleeding edge nightlies”). Or you can download the release candidate here (zip).

WordPress 3.5 Release Candidate 2

Posted November 29, 2012 by Andrew Nacin. Filed under Development, Testing.

The second release candidate for WordPress 3.5 is now available for download and testing.

We’re still working on about a dozen remaining issues, but we hope to deliver WordPress 3.5 to your hands as early as next week. If you’d like to know what to test, visit the About page ( → About in the toolbar) and check out the list of features! As usual, this is still development software and we suggest you do not install this on a live site unless you are adventurous.

Think you’ve found a bug? Please post to the Alpha/Beta area in the support forums.

Developers, please continue to test your plugins and themes, so that if there is a compatibility issue, we can figure it out before the final release. You can find our list of known issues here.

To test WordPress 3.5, try the WordPress Beta Tester plugin (you’ll want “bleeding edge nightlies”). Or you can download the release candidate here (zip).


We are getting close
Should have asked for haiku help
Please test RC2

WordPress 3.5 Release Candidate

Posted November 22, 2012 by Andrew Nacin. Filed under Development, Testing.

The first release candidate for WordPress 3.5 is now available.

We hope to ship WordPress 3.5 in two weeks. But to do that, we need your help! If you haven’t tested 3.5 yet, there’s no time like the present. (The oft-repeated warning: Please, not on a live site, unless you’re adventurous.)

Think you’ve found a bug? Please post to the Alpha/Beta area in the support forums. If any known issues come up, you’ll be able to find them here. Developers, please test your plugins and themes, so that if there is a compatibility issue, we can figure it out before the final release.

To test WordPress 3.5, try the WordPress Beta Tester plugin (you’ll want “bleeding edge nightlies”). Or you can download the release candidate here (zip).

If you’d like to know what to break test, visit the About page ( → About in the toolbar) and check out the list of features! Trust me, you want to try out media.

Release candidate
Three point five in two weeks time
Please test all the things

WordPress 3.5 Beta 3

Posted November 13, 2012 by Andrew Nacin. Filed under Development, Releases, Testing.

The third beta release of WordPress 3.5 is now available for download and testing.

Hey, developers! We expect to WordPress 3.5 to be ready in just a few short weeks. Please, please test your plugins and themes against beta 3. Media management has been rewritten, and we’ve taken great pains to ensure most plugins will work the same as before, but we’re not perfect. We would like to hear about any incompatibilities we’ve caused so we can work with you to address them before release, rather than after. I think you’ll agree it’s much better that way. :-)

To test WordPress 3.5, try the WordPress Beta Tester plugin (you’ll want “bleeding edge nightlies”). Or you can download the beta here (zip). For more on 3.5, check out the extensive Beta 1 blog post, which covers what’s new in version 3.5 and how you can help. We made more than 300 changes since beta 2At this point, the Add Media dialog is complete, and we’re now just working on fixing up inserting images into the editor. We’ve also updated to jQuery UI 1.9.1, SimplePie 1.3.1, and TinyMCE 3.5.7.

The usual warnings apply: We can see the light at the end of the tunnel, but this is software still in development, so we don’t recommend that you run it on a production site. Set up a test site to play with the new version.

As always, if you think you’ve found a bug, you can post to the Alpha/Beta area in the support forums. Or, if you’re comfortable writing a reproducible bug report, file one on the WordPress Trac. There, you can also find a list of known bugs and everything we’ve fixed so far.

Beta three is out
Soon, a release candidate
Three point five is near

WordPress 3.5 Beta 2

Posted October 13, 2012 by Andrew Nacin. Filed under Releases, Testing.

Two weeks after the first beta, WordPress 3.5 Beta 2 is now available for download and testing.

This is software still in development, so we don’t recommend that you run it on a production site. Set up a test site to play with the new version. To test WordPress 3.5, try the WordPress Beta Tester plugin (you’ll want “bleeding edge nightlies”). Or you can download the beta here (zip).

For more, check out the extensive Beta 1 blog post, which covers what’s new in version 3.5 and how you can help. What’s new since beta 1? I’m glad you asked:

  • New workflow for working with image galleries, including drag-and-drop reordering and quick caption editing.
  • New image editing API. (#6821)
  • New user interface for setting static front pages for the Reading Settings screen. (#16379)

As always, if you think you’ve found a bug, you can post to the Alpha/Beta area in the support forums. Or, if you’re comfortable writing a reproducible bug report, file one on the WordPress Trac. There, you can also find a list of known bugs and everything we’ve fixed so far. Happy testing!

WordPress 3.5 Beta 1 (and a bonus!)

Posted September 27, 2012 by Andrew Nacin. Filed under Releases, Testing.

I’m excited to announce the availability of WordPress 3.5 Beta 1.

This is software still in development and we really don’t recommend that you run it on a production site — set up a test site just to play with the new version. To test WordPress 3.5, try the WordPress Beta Tester plugin (you’ll want “bleeding edge nightlies”). Or you can download the beta here (zip).

In just three short months, we’ve already made a few hundred changes to improve your WordPress experience. The biggest thing we’ve been working on is overhauling the media experience from the ground up. We’ve made it all fair game: How you upload photos, arrange galleries, insert images into posts, and more. It’s still rough around the edges and some pieces are missing — which means now is the perfect time to test it out, report issues, and help shape our headline feature.

As always, if you think you’ve found a bug, you can post to the Alpha/Beta area in the support forums. Or, if you’re comfortable writing a reproducible bug report, file one on the WordPress Trac. There, you can also find a list of known bugs and everything we’ve fixed so far.

Here’s some more of what’s new:

  • Appearance: A simplified welcome screen. A new color picker. And the all-HiDPI (retina) dashboard.
  • Accessibility: Keyboard navigation and screen reader support have both been improved.
  • Plugins: You can browse and install plugins you’ve marked as favorites on WordPress.org, directly from your dashboard.
  • Mobile: It’ll be easier to link up your WordPress install with our mobile apps, as XML-RPC is now enabled by default.
  • Links: We’ve hidden the Link Manager for new installs. (Don’t worry, there’s a plugin for that.)

Developers: We love you. We do. And one of the things we strive to do with every release is be compatible with all existing plugins and themes. To make sure we don’t break anything, we need your help. Please, please test your plugins and themes against 3.5. If something isn’t quite right, please let us know. (Chances are, it wasn’t intentional.) And despite all of the changes to media, we’re still aiming to be backwards compatible with plugins that make changes to the existing media library. It’s a tall task, and it means we need your help.

Here’s some more things we think developers will enjoy (and should test their plugins and themes against):

  • External libraries updated: TinyMCE  3.5.6 3.5.7. SimplePie 1.3 1.3.1. jQuery 1.8.2 1.8.3. jQuery UI 1.9 (and it’s not even released yet) 1.9.2. We’ve also added Backbone 0.9.2 and Underscore 1.3.3 1.4.2, and you can use protocol-relative links when enqueueing scripts and styles. (#16560)
  • WP Query: You can now ask to receive posts in the order specified by post__in. (#13729)
  • XML-RPC: New user management, profile editing, and post revision methods. We’ve also removed AtomPub. (#18428, #21397, #21866)
  • Multisite: switch_to_blog() is now used in more places, is faster, and more reliable. Also: You can now use multisite in a subdirectory, and uploaded files no longer go through ms-files (for new installs). (#21434, #19796, #19235)
  • TinyMCE: We’ve added an experimental API for “views” which you can use to offer previews and interaction of elements from the visual editor. (#21812)
  • Posts API: Major performance improvements when working with hierarchies of pages and post ancestors. Also, you can now “turn on” native custom columns for taxonomies on edit post screens. (#11399, #21309#21240)
  • Comments API: Search for comments of a particular status, or with a meta query (same as with WP_Query). (#21101, #21003)
  • oEmbed: We’ve added support for a few oEmbed providers, and we now handle SSL links. (#15734, #21635, #16996, #20102)

We’re looking forward to your feedback. If you break it (find a bug), please report it, and if you’re a developer, try to help us fix it. We’ve already had more than 200 contributors to version 3.5 — come join us!

And as promised, a bonus:

We’re planning a December 5 release for WordPress 3.5. But, we have a special offering for you, today. The newest default theme for WordPress, Twenty Twelve, is now available for download from the WordPress themes directory. It’s a gorgeous and fully responsive theme, and it works with WordPress 3.4.2. Take it for a spin!

WordPress 3.4.2 Maintenance and Security Release

Posted September 6, 2012 by Andrew Nacin. Filed under Releases, Security.

WordPress 3.4.2, now available for download, is a maintenance and security release for all previous versions.

After nearly 15 million downloads since 3.4 was released not three months ago, we’ve identified and fixed a number of nagging bugs, including:

  • Fix some issues with older browsers in the administration area.
  • Fix an issue where a theme may not preview correctly, or its screenshot may not be displayed.
  • Improve plugin compatibility with the visual editor.
  • Address pagination problems with some category permalink structures.
  • Avoid errors with both oEmbed providers and trackbacks.
  • Prevent improperly sized header images from being uploaded.

Version 3.4.2 also fixes a few security issues and contains some security hardening. The vulnerabilities included potential privilege escalation and a bug that affects multisite installs with untrusted users. These issues were discovered and fixed by the WordPress security team.

Download 3.4.2 now or visit Dashboard → Updates in your site admin to update now.

Fixes for some bugs
Back to work on 3.5
It’s time to update

Event Organizers Unite!

Posted July 13, 2012 by Jen Mylo. Filed under Community, Events.

I’m happy to announce the formation of a new official contributor group within the WordPress project for the organizers of in-person events that promote WordPress. Though there are hundreds of people around the globe organizing WordCamps, WordPress meetups, hackathons, free classes and the like, since their “projects” were all happening locally there was never a central hub of activity for these folks. Despite the many informal connections between community organizers, we weren’t taking advantage of the huge existing knowledge base as new organizers stepped up to the plate.

With the creation of this new contributor group, we finally have a way to organize and recognize these kinds of contributions, a clear avenue for feedback and input when it comes to policies around official events, and the opportunity to create even more connections between community organizers through mentorship programs and group projects. I’m especially excited about the creation of this group because until now the role of community organizer, while one of the most important, has not gotten the same recognition as higher-profile contribution methods such as forum support or core code contribution. That is something I hope this group will change, and the local organizers can be recognized for the community leaders they are.*

If you are the organizer of a local WordCamp, WordPress meetup, etc., head over to http://make.wordpress.org/events/ and introduce yourself so we can include you in the fun!

Speaking of meetups, an update on my last post about meetups is long overdue. With around 500 meetup organizers (and/or potential organizers) responding to my last survey, it took much longer than anticipated to review all the responses. We’re working now with meetup.com to issue invitations to join a centralized WordPress Meetup account, so if you filled out the form earlier this year, you should be hearing from them soon. The first wave of existing meetup account transfers (for those who opted in) should happen in the next two weeks, with additional waves every 3 months thereafter (and new groups will be able to be created along the way).

The contributor summit that is being planned for the end of October also generated hundreds of responses/nominations, so that review process is still happening, but we should be announcing some basic plans and issuing invitations soon.

And finally, it would be impossible to talk about in-person WordPress events without mentioning the upcoming annual WordCamp in San Francisco. As the event that represents the worldwide project as a whole, it’s the perfect time to evaluate where we stand as a project and as a community, to help determine where we go next. If you’re a WordPress user, developer, or in any way a part of our vast and interconnected ecosystem, please take a moment to fill in the 2nd annual WordPress survey. It’s just a couple of questions, and your input would be greatly appreciated. The results of the survey will be announced at WSCF, and a report issued shortly thereafter.

Thanks!

* I am also of the firm belief that academic and arts activities should earn varsity letters just like sports teams do — go mathletes! 

WordPress 3.4.1 Maintenance and Security Release

Posted June 27, 2012 by Andrew Nacin. Filed under Releases, Security.

WordPress 3.4.1 is now available for download. WordPress 3.4 has been a very smooth release, and copies are flying off the shelf — 3 million downloads in two weeks! This maintenance release addresses 18 bugs with version 3.4, including:

  • Fixes an issue where a theme’s page templates were sometimes not detected.
  • Addresses problems with some category permalink structures.
  • Better handling for plugins or themes loading JavaScript incorrectly.
  • Adds early support for uploading images on iOS 6 devices.
  • Allows for a technique commonly used by plugins to detect a network-wide activation.
  • Better compatibility with servers running certain versions of PHP (5.2.4, 5.4) or with uncommon setups (safe mode, open_basedir), which had caused warnings or in some cases prevented emails from being sent.

Version 3.4.1 also fixes a few security issues and contains some security hardening. The vulnerabilities included potential information disclosure as well as an bug that affects multisite installs with untrusted users. These issues were discovered and fixed by the WordPress security team.

Download 3.4.1 now or visit Dashboard → Updates in your site admin to update now.

Green was a bit green
We have hardened it up some
Update WordPress now

WordPress 3.4 “Green”

Posted June 13, 2012 by Matt Mullenweg. Filed under Releases.

WordPress 3.4 is here and out the door. We’ve dubbed this release “Green” in honor of guitarist Grant Green whose soulful simplicity has kept many of us company during this release.

This release includes significant improvements to theme customization, custom headers, Twitter embeds, and image captions — here’s a short clip with the highlights:

For Users

The biggest change in 3.4 is the theme customizer which allows you to play around with various looks and settings for your current theme or one you’re thinking about switching to without publishing those changes to the whole world. For themes that support it, you can change colors, backgrounds, and of course custom image headers. We have more planned for the customizer down the road.

Throughout the rest of the admin you’ll notice tweaks to make your everyday life easier. For example, if you have lots of themes we’ve made it quicker to browse them all at once without paging. We’ve made it possible to use images from your media library to populate custom headers, and for you to choose the height and width of your header images.

We’ve expanded our embed support to include tweets: just put a Twitter permalink on its own line in the post editor and we’ll turn it into a beautiful embedded Tweet. And finally, image captions have been improved to allow HTML, like links, in them.

For Developers

There are hundreds of under-the-hood improvements in this release, notably in the XML-RPC, themes, and custom header APIs, and significant performance improvements in WP_Query and the translation system. The Codex has a pretty good summary of the developer features, and you can always dive into Trac directly.

We’ve also put together a busy developer’s field guide to the new APIs in 3.4.

It takes a village

Here are some of the fine folks who were involved in bringing 3.4 to the world:

082net, Aaron D. Campbell, Adam Harley, AJ Acevedo, akshayagarwal, Alex Concha, Alex King, Alex Mills (Viper007Bond), ampt, Amy Hendrix, Andrea Rennick, Andrew Nacin, Andrew Ozz, Andrew Ryno, Andy Skelton, Arie Putranto, Austin Matzko, Barry, BenChapman, Ben Huson, Benjamin J. Balter, Bill Erickson, Billy (bananastalktome), Boone Gorges, camiloclc, casben79, Caspie, ceefour, cheald, chellycat, Chelsea Otakan, Chip Bennett, Chris Olbekson, Coen Jacobs, Cristi Burcă, Cyapow, Dan Collis-Puro, Daniel Bachhuber, Daniel Convissor, Daniel Jalkut (Red Sweater), daniloercoli, Daryl Koopersmith, David Gwyer, deltafactory, demetris, Dion Hulse, dllh, Dominik Schilling, Doug Provencio, Drew Jaynes (DrewAPicture), ebababi, edward-mindreantre, emhr, Empireoflight, Eric Andrew Lewis, Eric Mann, Evan Anderson, Evan Solomon, Fred Wu, Fumito Mizuno, Gary Cao, Gary Jones, Gautam, Gennady Kovshenin, George Mamadashvili, George Stephanis, Gustavo Bordoni, hearvox, Helen Hou-Sandi, Hugo Baeta, Ian Stewart, insertvisionhere, Ipstenu, Jacob Chappell, Jane Wells, Japh, jaquers, JarretC, jeremyclarke, Jeremy Felt, Jesper Johansen (Jayjdk), Jiehan Zheng, Joachim Jensen (Intox Studio), Joachim Kudish (jkudish), John Blackbourn (johnbillion), John Ford, John James Jacoby, Jon Cave, Joost de Valk, Jorge Bernal, Joseph Scott, Justin, Justin Givens, Kailey Lampert (trepmal), Kenan Dervisevic, Konstantin Kovshenin, Konstantin Obenland, Kristopher Lagraff, Kurt Payne, Lance Willett, Lardjo, Lee Willis (leewillis77), linuxologos, Lutz Schroer, Mantas Malcius, Marcus, Mark Jaquith, Marko Heijnen, Mark Rowatt Anderson, Matias Ventura, Matt Martz, mattonomics, Matt Thomas, Matt Wiebe, MattyRob, Max Cutler, Mert Yazicioglu, mgolawala, Michael Adams (mdawaffe), Michael Beckwith, Michael Fields, Mike Schinkel, Mike Schroder, Mike Toppa, Milan Dinic, mitcho (Michael Yoshitaka Erlewine), Mohammad Jangda, mrtorrent, Name.ly, Naoko McCracken, Nashwan Doaqan, Niall Kennedy, Nikolay Yordanov, norocketsurgeon, npetetin, Nuno Morgadinho, Olivier Collet, Paul Biron, pavelevap, Pete Mall, Peter Westwood, pishmishy, Prasath Nadarajah, prettyboymp, Ptah Dunbar, pw201, Rami Yushuvaev, Rarst, RENAUT, Reuben Gunday, Roscius, Ross Hanney, russellwwest, Ryan Boren, Ryan Duff, Ryan McCue, Safirul Alredha, Samir Shah, Samuel “Otto” Wood, Seisuke Kuraishi, Sergey Biryukov, Simon Wheatley, sirzooro, sksmatt, Stas Sușkov, Stephane Daury (stephdau), tamlyn, Thomas Griffin, Thorsten Ott, TobiasBg, Tom Auger, Toni Viemero, transom, Ulrich Sossou, Utkarsh Kukreti, Wojtek Szkutnik, wonderslug, Xavier Borderie, Yoav Farhi, Zach “The Z Man” Abernathy, Zack Tollman, Ze Fontainhas, and zx2c4.

See you next time!

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For more WordPress news, check out the WordPress Planet.

There’s also a development P2 blog.

To see how active the project is check out our Trac timeline, it often has 20–30 updates per day.

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