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Ideas

Integrate the best plugin ideas into the core product

  1. Xander
    Member

    12345

    The idea:
    Integrate functionality from the best or most popular plugin packages. Put that code right in the core product, so every WP version "ships" with the extended features that users are demanding.

    Examples: Ultimate Tag Warrior, Event Calender 3, etc. Complicated plugins that seldom feel as if they are very well integrated with WP out of the box...

    Background:
    One thing that has long irked me about WordPress is this whole philosophy of "if we can't do it there's probably a plugin for it"... now, on the surface, this is very true--many things one might want to do above and beyond the basic setup can be accomplished with a plugin. The problem is simply that many plugin authors don't maintain their code, and newer versions of WP aren't necessarily going to support the code of an old plugin. Not to mention the issues with quality control of code and the sheer number of plugins that need to be sorted through. Plugins are great--don't get me wrong--but it can become problematic to have to maintain a herd of twenty or more just to get some basic things done that could easily be accomplished by expanding the core admin options or some such thing.

    Posted: 7 years ago #
  2. mozey
    Member

    12345

    it should NOT be in the core. it could be shipped with it, like that "hello dolly" plugin, but seriously dude, why?, you can download and install plugins :)

    Posted: 7 years ago #
  3. Xander
    Member

    12345

    Plugins suck. They are basically features that the WP dev team doesn't feel like putting in the software. Sure, there are some esoteric plugins out there that you wouldn't want to integrate; I am speaking of very basic functionality that most bloggers would benefit from. Why leave it to a sketchy bunch of plugin authors to get basic things done? Any time WP jumps a version number your entire fragile ecosystem could crumble into dust. When I jumped from 1.5 to 2.0 I had to sacrifice certain features I had built into my blog because the plugin was irrevocably snafu'd, and the author nowhere to be found!

    Plugins are a great idea, but I think WP needs to expand the scope of stuff that should be considered "core" or at least "shipped with"... the resistance to having certain pre-existing plugin functionality integrated into WP itself is quite frustrating!

    Posted: 7 years ago #
  4. ninjaboy
    Member

    I would rather the WP team stuck to optimising the core functionality and extended features remain plugins. I've been using WP for nearly 2 years now and feel confident the team arent lost in the code of their latest greatest wizbang feature whilst backdoors open in the code for nasty people to exploit! The recent 2.0.7 release is a good example - no wizbang, just something we can really rely on.

    There is certainly an argument for a limited number of really popular, well supported plugins to go out with the releases - but they should remain in wp-content/plugins in my opinion!

    Posted: 7 years ago #
  5. Xmion
    Member

    12345

    I don't think this is a good ide better to have no plugins and let the user make the choice by them self..

    I stick to ninjaboy's good comment. i wanna vote -5 on this one.

    Posted: 7 years ago #
  6. Xander
    Member

    12345

    Plugin popularity is also a way of identifying desired features. I would wager that the many people using a tags plugin indicates that people want more powerful tagging features in WP itself, and so on. What's so -5 about that?

    Posted: 7 years ago #
  7. mozey
    Member

    12345

    I use wordpress as a development base to,,,,,,,,,,, well, all of my clients. And i have yet met a client who was interested in tags one way or form. Mind you!, i'm using wordpress as a CMS. So in my case, if you integrated tags, it would slow down the performance and clutter my DB by that much!.Until tags become a standard within ALL SITES. Then, hey!!

    "Plugins suck. They are basically features that the WP dev team doesn't feel like putting in the software."

    First of all, why do they suck?!?!, you have to do your homework on which ones to use, then activate them. Boom!, your done. This system works VERY WELL.

    Secondley, as long as you can keep your software feather weight right out of the box, the software will work.

    I donno, thats how i feel.

    Posted: 7 years ago #
  8. whooami
    Member

    I have to agree with everyone else here that object.

    Plugins are plugins for a reason. The core is where the devs need to stick, and i believe its safe to say that they will.

    The flexibility that WP is, lies in the plugins, and bloating the core with things that not everyone wants, but also provides more work for them. Its difficult enough to manage all the lines of code that the core is, much less adding in plugins, most of which they had they no say in the writing of.

    Lastly, its just sheer laziness on anyone's part to expect them to do that. You want a plugin, go download one, and install it.

    It takes 4 actions on your part. For them to support the damn thing once its been integrated into the core takes a LOT more work.

    Posted: 7 years ago #
  9. Ajd777
    Member

    12345

    Certain plugins need to be given an official version in the core. UTW as is should never be integrated into the core, but the lead developers need to create an in-house version of it. Certain features such as tags are really needed in the blogging world. To ignore them is simple, just as it is easy to ignore the theme editor, future posts sub-categories and all of the other features that are only needed for some people.

    I personally use WordPress as a CMS, and in some of those sites I don't even use things like categories, but one has to remember that WordPress is blogging software that makes a good CMS; not the other way around.

    To the idea itself: Yes, the lead developers should use popular plugins as ideas of what to add. For the most part plugins are used to fill holes in the software. Some of these holes are only noticed by a few people, but others are gapping holes. I personally would love to see everyone of my plugins turned obsolete because I see them as filling holes.

    Posted: 7 years ago #
  10. Xander
    Member

    12345

    You want a plugin, go download one, and install it.

    It is seldom that simple. It is never "BOOM! you're done"... the quality of coding and the general lack of support makes the whole WP experience that much more unfriendly. What exactly is this "Ideas" section for if not to identify stuff that could be done with a plugin, but that users would like to see as part of the application itself?

    Posted: 7 years ago #

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