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Ideas

Fully Realized Subscriber Role / Community Features

  1. tommyill
    Member

    12345

    The subscriber role as it exists in WordPress is basically an author who can't post. What is needed is a true subscriber role catered to someone who is coming to a site to read and interact with the authors and other users. Subscribers shouldn't have access to the Dashboard. They should be able to delete their own account. Subscribers should have their own template page for profiles (different from authors). There should be hooks so it is easier to develop plugins extending the subscribers abilities and interaction options (private messaging, extended profile editing, etc).

    Posted: 7 years ago #
  2. varkenshand
    Member

    12345

    True, a subscriber is typically someone who cannot do anything except commenting on posts. So what does he need the Dashboard for. It is confusing imho. When logged in a subscriber should return to the post where he clicked the Login in the first place.

    Posted: 6 years ago #
  3. jedimacfan
    Member

    12345

    Agreed. I wish this were a capability of WordPress.

    Posted: 6 years ago #
  4. gMk
    Member

    Agreed

    Posted: 6 years ago #
  5. purplekitten
    Member

    12345

    I am trying to persuade the marketing people to use wordpress as a CMS, but they want to be able to have different users get different content. Having a logged in user go to the dashboard is madness unless they can actually do something! Please consider this idea harder xxx

    Posted: 5 years ago #
  6. dala
    Member

    12345

    I agree fully with the author of the first post. For the blog I am developing, I want to limit the access so that only registered users can read. Therefore they need to get subscriber accounts.

    The user experience of a subscriber should be as smooth as possible.

    Posted: 5 years ago #
  7. Steve Taylor
    Member

    12345

    Amen. I'm managing to work around the current system with hacks, but it's difficult, and still leaves a patchy experience for Subscribers.

    The fact that "Private" posts are hidden from Subscribers is a further indication that this Role needs further thought. Maybe there are reasons, but this functionality seems ideal for creating Subscriber-only content - but you have to hack to get it to work.

    Being able to embed profile management into a front-end screen would be great too.

    Posted: 5 years ago #
  8. valuxes
    Member

    12345

    Fully agree. Just want readers to register ("subscribe") so they can comment (don't want them to have to enter name and email everytime they comment). Register/login on a page, return to the page, no dashboard. Simple, no hassle, intuitive.

    If a "subscriber" is later granted extra privileges by the admin, say to blog, then the dashboard implementation now makes sense.

    Disagree that this should be a plugin/theme -- too much maintenance of plugins/themes already as it stands (since WP does not see it fit to make new versions backward compatible).

    Posted: 5 years ago #
  9. chipharris
    Member

    One thing that is needed most is for subscriber content. I've come to this page looking for information about what to do with a subscriber. Once they subscribe they have no more functionality or information to access SO why would they bother. Is there a plugin that helps us communicate with our subscribers, offer them a reason to subscribe. It's confusing for them to see the register button in with the admin section of the site. I need a way to pull it out of there and have it stand on it's own with reasons why to join. I would like to develop a long list of subscribers for a number of reasons. Any ideas? Chip.

    Posted: 5 years ago #
  10. benz001
    Member

    12345

    I couldn't agree more with this thread.

    The lack of a decent front end only subscriber model is the only reason we use products other than wordpress for our small to mid level projects.

    When we go through our clients requirements its inevitably the subscriber issue that swings the balance to a different Blog/CMS platform, and for most small projects they just don't need the other bells and whistles (and complex UIs) that paid for CMS's tend to bring - a lot of them blog already and would prefer to keep using WordPress!

    Posted: 4 years ago #

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  • Rating

    12345
    69 Votes
  • Status

    This is plugin territory